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Walton-Goggins.net

Your only news source for all things on actor Walton Goggins.

Category: News

‘Tomb Raider’ Reboot Casts Walton Goggins as Villain Opposite Alicia Vikande

Walton Goggins is in final negotiations to join Warner Bros, MGM and GK Films reboot of “Tomb Raider,” the latest adaptation of the popular video game starring Alicia Vikander as the iconic character Lara Croft.

WB recently announced the pic would be released on March 16, 2018 with Norwegian director Roar Uthaug helming.

Goggins would play the antagonist in the film.

MGM joined the project in 2013, acquiring rights to the popular video game to develop the feature in partnership with Graham King’s GK Films. King, who acquired “Tomb Raider” in 2011 from Square Enix, will serve as producer.

The original “Tomb Raider” video game was released in 1996 by London-based Eidos, which is now part of Square Enix. The games have sold over 35 million units. Square Enix released a reboot in 2013 with a younger Croft (age 21) being sent off on her first big adventure amid amped-up action and set pieces.

Paramount’s two films starring Angelina Jolie as the British archaeologist were released in 2001 and 2003 and grossed $432 million worldwide.

Warner Bros. will co-produce the pic with MGM and GK Films.

Goggins has already had a busy year on the TV front with his HBO series “Vice Principals” which just wrapped its first season and was renewed for a second. On the film side he was most recently seen in Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight” and also has the Seal Team Six History Channel series “Six” bowing next year.

He is repped by ICM Partners and Darris Hatch Management.

Source: Variety.com

‘Six’ Art Shows Walton Goggins in Need of Rescuing

‘Six’ Art Shows Walton Goggins in Need of Rescuing

After wrapping six seasons on FX’s Justified, Walton Goggins took a break from TV drama with the dark HBO comedy Vice Principals. But he’s back for more next month in Six, a scripted series inspired by SEAL Team Six missions, premiering Jan. 18 on History.

As the key art conveys, Goggins stars as a former leader of SEAL Team Six, Richard “Rip” Taggart, who’s captured by Boko Haram alongside the students and teacher of a girls’ school in Nigeria. The men formerly under his command request the rescue mission, and get it, because even though an unraveled Rip left them for contract work after making a questionable decision during a 2014 mission in Afghanistan — an event that will have surprising reverberations two years later — they’re still brothers.

“This is the most elite fighting force in the world,” Goggins says in the behind-the-scenes video below. “You don’t do what these guys do and escape that without real consequences.”

Through flashbacks, we see Rip build the team up and his downward spiral. In the present day, we watch Rip try to rediscover his humanity and SEAL identity as that brotherhood, now led by Rip’s protégé, Barry Sloane’s Joe “Bear” Graves, continues to fight on despite the price the men pay as husbands and fathers.

Six is created by William Broyles (Cast Away, Apollo 13, Jarhead) and David Broyles, a military special operations veteran, who join Bruce C. McKenna (Band of Brothers, The Pacific), Karen Campbell (Dexter), and Alfredo Barrios Jr. (Burn Notice) as writers on the series. Retired U.S. Navy SEAL Mitchell Hall (Zero Dark Thirty, Lone Survivor) serves as the series’s technical advisor.

Six premieres Jan. 18 at 10 p.m. on History.

Source: Yahoo.com

Navy SEAL Drama ‘SIX’ Gets Premiere Date at History

Navy SEAL Drama ‘SIX’ Gets Premiere Date at History

History’s highly anticipated Navy SEAL drama, SIX — led by Justified favorite Walton Goggins — will begin its mission on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, the cable network announced, while also releasing a cast photo.

Inspired by real missions and promising to “authentically capture the inside world of America’s elite Special Operations unit,” SIX‘s eight-episode first season follows members of Navy SEAL Team Six, whose covert mission to eliminate a Taliban leader in Afghanistan goes awry when they uncover a U.S. citizen working with terrorists.

The series opens with troop leader Richard “Rip” Taggart (played by Goggins) making a questionable decision while on a mission in Afghanistan. Two years later, Rip is captured by Boko Haram, Nigeria’s militant Islamist group, and it’s up to his former SEAL Team Six brothers — played by Jaylen Moore (Homeland), Kyle Schmid (Copper), Barry Sloane (Revenge), Juan Pablo Raba (Narcos), Edwin Hodge (Chicago Fire) and Donny Boaz (The Great Debaters) — to put their differences aside to locate and rescue their onetime leader.

SIX also stars Dominic Adams (Devious Maids), Brianne Davis (Jarhead), Nadine Velazquez (Flight), and Nondumiso Tembe (True Blood).

Source: TVLine.com

Walton Goggins To Star In ‘Keeping It Real’ Showtime Comedy

Walton Goggins is set as the star of a high-profile comedy project, which has landed at Showtime for development with a significant commitment. Titled Keeping It Real, the dark comedy is created/written by Charles Randolph, an Oscar winner for co-writing The Big Short, and has two other writing Oscar winners, Nat Faxon and Jim Rash (The Descendants), attached to direct. The project hails from Showtime as well as CBS TV Studios and studio-based Timberman/Beverly, reuniting Justified executive producers Sarah Timberman and Carl Beverly with the hit series’ co-star Goggins.

Penned by Randolph, Keeping It Real chronicles a narcissistic but well-intentioned movie star (Goggins) who travels to global hot spots and inserts himself into international incidents, only to create more chaos. Goggins executive produces the project with Randolph, Faxon, Rash, Timberman, Beverly and B Story’s Kevin Walsh.

Goggins currently stars opposite Danny McBride on the HBO dark comedy series Vice Principals where he has fulfilled his two-season commitment. Goggins also has a pivotal role in History’s upcoming Navy SEALs drama series Six. He has just wrapped the feature The Three Christs of Ypsilanti, in which he plays the role of Christ opposite Richard Gere who portrays a doctor treating paranoid schizophrenic patients, each of whom believe they are Jesus Christ. Jon Avnet is directing from a script he wrote with Eric Nazarian, adapted from biographical novel by Milton Rokeach.

Goggins, recently seen in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight, is repped by ICM Partners and manager Darris Hatch.

Randolph, whose feature writing credits also include Love & Other Drugs and The Interpreter, is repped by CAA and Lighthouse Management. Faxon is with CAA and Principato-Young, Rash with CAA and Primary Wave.

Source: Deadline.com

Vanity Fair: TV’s Favorite Villain, Walton Goggins, On Braces, Pratfalls, and ‘Vice Principals’

Vanity Fair: TV’s Favorite Villain, Walton Goggins, On Braces, Pratfalls, and ‘Vice Principals’

V.F.com: Hi! How are you?

Walton Goggins: It’s good being back in California. I’ve been in North Carolina for like two months as a prisoner of war. Fuck, man! It’s been very . . . Wow. God, what a tough experience. We’re not here to talk about that. How are you?

I’m great! I’ve seen the first six episodes of Vice Principals!

Wow, the first six? Fantastic. Season 1 is about who these people are, and Season 2 is why they are who they are. It’s tough to be that fucking mean. Lee Russell is way meaner than Boyd Crowder. He comes around.

You’ve always been hilarious on Justified, and Sons of Anarchy but would you consider this your first full-blown comedy?

I do, yeah, even though Danny, and Jody, and David Gordon Green would say that they only make dramas that happen to be funny. Once you look at this in the spring semester—because it really is a fall semester and a spring semester, and it’s one story, it’s one piece with different movements to it. It’s pretty fucking dark in a satiating way, and, hopefully, I think it’s funny.

Were you nervous at all to dive fully into the comedy genre?

I was studying Vice Principals while I was doing The Hateful Eight, and I got on a plane the day that we wrapped. After a 24-hour day I went straight to the airport and jumped on a plane, and landed in Charleston, and at ten o’clock at night went home and got my hair dyed. I got my tips done until one o’clock in the morning, and started work at six o’clock the next morning.

I was as intimidated as anything I’ve ever done, and in some ways probably more so because the idea of improv-ing with Danny McBride was—fuck, man—I just couldn’t sleep at night. He’s so smart, and their humor is so specific. I didn’t want to let him down; I didn’t want to let HBO down. It’s a lot to step into that ring with the roughhouse boys and how they do their things. Kenny Powers is an iconic character, and to play at that level I think would be intimidating for anybody.

How much improvising did you wind up doing?

Daily. All day long. That was the hardest part of this entire experience for me, I think for both of us, was containing the laughter. You just look at Bill Murray. It’s Meatballs! That’s my guy! That was really the hardest part. We would go on these tangents that would take us in places that were sublime, but then we would always come back to the text. Most of it is as it was scripted, as Danny wrote.

What about the physical comedy? Was that a new muscle that you had to learn?

I would be curious to hear what a comedian has to say about that, because I don’t look at it in those terms. If I thought about it as, “I need to be physically funny,” then I don’t think that I could have done it. I think I would have been too self-conscious. It’s no different than Boyd Crowder, or [The Hateful Eight’s] Chris Mannix, or [Sons of Anarchy’s] Venus Van Dam, or anybody else. It’s just, if you’re true to who this person is, and you understand who this person is, and they are an authentic human being in the world, a heightened, at times, person in the world, then the way that they walk, and the way that they talk, and they way that they interact, all of that is a part of it, is a part of the situation that lives in your imagination.

You talked about Kenny Powers being an iconic character. You auditioned for Eastbound and Down, right? Which role?

I auditioned for the role that Jason Sudeikis wound up getting. I had braces on at the time, and I had just wrapped a season of Justified. I took that time to take care of some personal business, and I had these braces on and I wasn’t taking a job for four or five months. So I got these braces on my teeth and then they called and it was like, “Fuck it, I’m not taking the braces off, I need to get my teeth fixed. I’ve been putting this off a long time, so fuck it, he’ll love it.”

I walked into this room with my braces on, and my fucking shorts on, and some white tube socks. I walked in and there were me and four comedians from Saturday Night Live, and it was like, “Well, this is never going to happen.” That’s Jason, that’s so-and-so, this is crazy. I had a great time, and we had a lot of chemistry. I just talked to him philosophically about Kenny Powers and what that means. What does Kenny Powers mean, from my own fanboy opinion.

He tolerated my opinion, and we actually really got along. I had always wanted to work with Danny. I’ve been a fan of his ever since The Foot Fist Way,, and I thought that I got his comedy and that we could do something really unique together. I always wanted to just jump in the sandbox with him. That was the treat. Even though the opportunity didn’t ultimately happen at that stage, it was still a fucking thrill to be in the room with him and to go through his story. I just think Eastbound and Down* was one of the most exciting, dangerous comedies to come out in a very long time. Continue reading

LA Times: Walton Goggins is out for laughs, not blood, in HBO’s ‘Vice Principals’


Walton Goggins celebrated last holiday season as part of “The Hateful Eight,” Quentin Tarantino’s brutal western involving a pair of bounty hunters, a female fugitive, a band of outlaws and others holed up at a stagecoach lodge. By the final reel, Goggins, as the racist incoming sheriff of a town called Red Rock, was neck deep in bloody mayhem.

The role in many respects was an extension of a gallery of multidimensional bad guys Goggins has played since his breakthrough as a member of a rogue police unit in the landmark FX drama “The Shield.”

Armed with a wide smile that is simultaneously disarming and sinister, Goggins has stamped his smooth-yet-charming menace on many other projects, including “Justified” and Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” He also surprised viewers with his humorous but poignant portrayal of the transgender character Venus Van Dam on the biker drama “Sons of Anarchy.”

On Sunday, Goggins goes from “The Hateful Eight” to a “hateful two” in HBO’s “Vice Principals,” in which high school administrators Lee Russell and Neal Gamby (Goggins and Danny McBride), who despise each other, join forces to bring down their new boss, the outwardly pleasant Dr. Belinda Brown (Kimberly Hebert Gregory).

“Vice Principals,” created by McBride and Jody Hill as a follow-up to their previous HBO comedy “Eastbound & Down,” is a revelation for Goggins watchers, representing both his first major lead and a distinct change of pace — the only body part he’s taking aim at this time is the funny bone.

But just because Goggins is showing a lighter side doesn’t mean he’s fooling around.

“While I haven’t done an outright comedy, I don’t think Danny and Jody make comedies,” Goggins, 44, said recently. “I think they make dramas that happen to be funny. [Danny] did not want to hire a comedian to go on this journey with him. He wanted to hire an actor who has been given an opportunity to be funny in a lot of dramas. And we do have a real chemistry together.” Continue reading

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