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Walton-Goggins.net

Your only news source for all things on actor Walton Goggins.

Category: Interviews

Walton talks about ‘Justified’, being from the South

The 38-year-old, who grew up in Lithia Springs, not only boasts starring roles in the FX hit series “Justified” and the upcoming summer blockbuster “Predators,” but Goggins also got engaged to his girlfriend of five years, screenwriter Nadia Conners (“The 11th Hour”) while on vacation in Mexico last month.

Goggins portrays a serial killer on the other side of the hunt in “Predators”, which opens in theaters Friday.

Earlier this summer, Goggins and I sat down at the Laurel Canyon Country Store, nestled in a quiet hamlet between the Hollywood Hills and San Fernando Valley. Both patrons and the owner alike dropped by our table to say hello; all echoed the same sentiment: Walton is a great guy.

Q: You’ve found a favorite spot in Los Angeles where everyone seems to know you.

A: I think that people try to find a sense of community wherever they go. Coming from the South, I grew up where you could see your neighbors, but they were a fair distance away. A field separated me from my neighbors Kermit and Fanny. So, I grew up with space. Moving to a city with 12 million people it’s hard to find space. Laurel Canyon provides the perfect hybrid for me in this city as it is urban, but it feels very bucolic. It gives me a feeling of home.

Q: Everybody here seems to know you. Do you ever get tired of that?

A: No, everyone has different levels of celebrity and my celebrity is very familiar and familial. Mostly people that come up to me feel like they have the right to do so and it’s usually resulted in a really nice conversation. So, for me, it’s the perfect level of celebrity. People aren’t shy to tell you how they feel about your work, and when you’re working on screen, you’re often working in a vacuum, so it’s nice to have the feedback from people that follow your work. Continue reading

The Making of Predators, Casting the Human Predators

Walton Goggins was cast as tattoo-covered, feral Walter Stans, a serial killer who thinks of himself as a rock star. “Walt has an energy that allows him to be funny in one moment, terrifying in the next,” says Antal. “You’re laughing with him and then you’re afraid of him. Every time Walt was on camera, all I could see was the crew slowly coming behind the monitors to watch him play. You don’t need coffee if you have Walt Goggins.”

Antal had cast Goggins, but Rodriguez was at the time unfamiliar with the actor’s acclaimed work on “The Shield” and other projects. Additionally, the character as scripted was still a work in progress. “I thought we were going to have to overhaul the character and go in an entirely different direction,” Rodriguez remembers. “And it was a predicament because Nimrod had already hired Walt. So, I said let’s just fly him down so I can at least say to him face to face, ‘Look, I’m sorry, we’re just changing the part radically, I’m not happy with it.” And Walt was an incredible collaborator and talent. He was my kind of actor – willing to do whatever it took to make the part work. He just started trying different things right then and there, bouncing off the walls with energy. He basically recreated that entire character of Stans from the ground up right there in the room. He created a very original character.”

“Stans has spent sixteen years on death row,” explains Goggins. “The first images that he sees outside of a prison cell of an alien jungle are just a little over-stimulating for him. He fancies himself the only celebrity on this new planet of terror and thinks that people should be asking him for his autograph. He’s dark, but also I think rather funny and pessimistic.”

A San Quentin orange jumpsuit and multiple tattoos, including a Scorpion tattoo on his neck, helped Goggins get into character. He spent on average of an hour and half in the make-up chair on a daily basis to maintain the fake body art. “The tattoos made me feel very authentic. It’s been interesting walking around, both Hawaii and Austin, with them on. You get the help that you need in stores and restaurants. You don’t get the help that you want, people are not helping you out of kindness. They’re helping you out of fear,” laughs Goggins.

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The Spoon Feed.com’s audio interview with Walton

[audio:https://walton-goggins.net/media/audio/thespoonfeed_june21st2010.mp3]
When you consider the leading men in today’s roles, few manage to capture the true essence of their characters. We so often are subjected to a constant barrage of the same garbage-roles, written in the same garbage-manner — the underdog always wins, the bad guys always lose…

Well when is comes to Walton Goggins career in both TV and Film, none of the aforementioned statements ring true. This guy has made a career out of making small-roles huge.

The best example I could give is Goggins’ portrayal of Shane Vendrell in FX’s gritty cop-drama The Shield. From the start of the series, Shane serves as a sort of right-hand-man to the main character, Vic Mackey (played by Michael Chiklis). Over the course of the 7 seasons, Shane goes from being a dude with some cool scenes and a moderate amount of screen-time, to the ultimate show-stopper. Literally. If you are familiar with The Shield you know what I’m talking about. If you aren’t, let me just say that Goggins trumps his colleagues on screen — and this cast included Glenn Close, CCH Pounder, Forrest Whittaker, etc. When I expressed my admiration for his performance on The Shield, Goggins just humbly laughed and diverted the conversation towards his experiences on and off the set with the other cast members.

As much as I admired and continue to admire Mr. Goggins’ work, his professional rapport and approach to the industry is one that Hollywood can learn from. Every time we referenced one of his roles he has this expression of thankfulness that I have rarely seen. The “movie-star” sense of entitlement just doesn’t exist with this guy. What I mean to say is: THIS GUY IS JUST A NORMAL DUDE.

I think that has a great deal to do with his Southern upbringing. Goggins is a native Atlantean, though since moving to L.A. he says his tastes have gradually shifted from “pulled-pork to sushi.”

In the upcoming Predator sequel, aptly entitled Predators, Walton is playing “Stans,” a vicious, sociopathological serial killer. As with many of his other projects, Predators is made up of a stellar ensemble cast; a huge asset to Walton considering his style seems to be so in touch with the people around him.

Keep your eye on this guy — I’m promise you he is going to be the biggest character actor of the new generation in Hollywood. Microwave some popcorn, pop a squat in your favorite chair and get comfortable, Walton Goggins is the newest household name, and he’s here to stay.

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Getting ‘Justified’ With Brother Boyd

[audio:https://walton-goggins.net/media/audio/May26th2010%20WBUR%20Interview.mp3]

One of actor Walton Goggins’ earliest moments on stage came at a Georgia hog-calling competition when he was just 10 years old.

“I walked up onstage, and they had to adjust the mike for sure, and just leaned up on my tiptoes and just let out the biggest hog call that has ever been heard in my family, certainly,” he tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “And I won — I got a big trophy with a large hog on top. I have it in my office.”

Goggins says his days on the hog-calling circuit certainly helped propel him toward an acting career. Though he’s played many characters over the years, he is perhaps best known for his roles on The Shield — where he played a member of a corrupt narcotics squad — and the current FX series Justified, where he plays a white supremacist turned born-again Christian named Boyd Crowder.

Crowder also happens to be a fugitive bank robber hiding in the hills of eastern Kentucky, and an old buddy of the county’s newest U.S. marshal, played by Timothy Olyphant — who’s now on the other side of the law.

Acquiring the long drawl he uses to portray the quick-witted Crowder, says Goggins, took quite a bit of time.
Continue reading

Walton on Justified’s Most Intriguing Character!

In a teleconference Q&A session at the beginning of this first season of FX’s Justified [Tuesdays, 10/9C], I had the opportunity to ask Walton Goggins, who plays Boyd Crowder, a couple of questions and found him to be articulate and witty. As a result, I requested an opportunity for a bit of one-on-one time with Goggins and the result was a lot of fun.

I’ve just finished screening the episodes that FX sent out, so I’m not the most prepared I’ve ever been.

Walton Goggins: Do you have a timeline? Do you need to do this today?

I finished the last ep about five minutes ago.

Goggins: And that would be?

The Hammer. The one with the combustible meth lab. So, yeah, I think I’m good. Let’s just do this while the eps are fresh in my mind.

Goggins: What did you think about the episode?

I thought it was great – but first let me congratulate you on becoming a series regular for season two.

Goggins: Thank you.Yeah, it’s very exciting!

When did you find out?

Goggins: We had been talking about it for a while, during the season, but I couldn’t commit because I was in negotiations for a few other things – and it came back around to my realizing that I’m on a show that I absolutely love doing; a character that challenges me, by the minute, on a network that is my home as an artist in a lot of ways. So it just made sense all the way around.

When we talked as part of the Q&A at the beginning of the season, you talked about how the pilot was shot with Boyd dying – how testing suggested that Boyd was a character who should be around – and you mentioned Timothy Olyphant‘s suggestion that Boyd would be too smart to be a racist @$$hole.

Goggins: Well, actually, I did not want to do Boyd as a racist @$$hole. Because I don’t believe that Boyd necessarily believes everything that he’s saying. Then Tim came up with the line – which was so wonderful – “I don’t believe that you believe anything you’re saying. I just think you like to blow $#!+ up.” Continue reading

Walton Talks Justified’s Season Finale


So, that happened. In other words, MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD if you have yet to watch the first season finale of ‘Justified.’

Seriously, HUMONGOUS SPOILER ALERT!

Still here? Then you already know who bit the dust last night — Boyd Crowder’s (Walton Goggins) wily papa Bo (M.C. Gainey). And you saw how Boyd, the show’s resident scene stealer, reacted to Bo’s brutal murder of Boyd’s religious cohorts, which seemed to prove that Boyd had been sincere about the born-again proclamation he sprung on Raylan (Timothy Olyphant) and the rest of Harlan County’s denizens after his brief incarceration earlier in the season.

Goggins, who, we have to reiterate, so deserves an Emmy nod for his ‘Justified’ role (and will be among the contenders for a nomination in the Guest Actor in a Drama category … he becomes a series regular in season 2), talked to TV Squad before the finale, and shared his thoughts on Bo’s death, Boyd finding — and maybe losing? — his religion and where his recent losses might lead him in season 2.

So, Bo’s dead, and not by Boyd’s hand …
How crazy was that? And after the beating [that Bo ordered Crowder cousin Johnny to administer to Boyd]. Did that make you feel for Boyd?

Oh yeah, definitely. But I felt for Boyd several times throughout the season. The biggest was when he went back to camp and found his men dead, hanging from the trees. His reaction, and that he cut them down and buried each one of them … you could see he was crushed. And it was the first definite bit of evidence as to what his motivations really are. He cared about those men, and didn’t take lightly that they had pledged their loyalty and trust to him.
Exactly! That is exactly it. It’s between that moment, and a question that Boyd asks a few scenes later, when he says to Raylan, ‘Do you believe in God?’ He asks Raylan that question. And I think that’s the first question that Boyd asks over the course of the entire season — ever — maybe ever in his life — where he doesn’t know the answer to it. He genuinely doesn’t know. And so, for me, that was a clear indication of where his heart was along this whole first season.

Now that his father is dead, will it be freeing for Boyd, or will he be in even more turmoil, trying to figure out who he is without this imposing figure there?
I think he has to figure out who he is without his father’s presence there, both physically and metaphysically. Both his fathers, I think, are dead in his eyes … one being his earthly father, and the other being his spiritual father. I don’t know where this guy goes from here.

A person who has a world view like Boyd Crowder’s … I don’t know what they do when their foundation — a person whose foundation is rarely, if ever, rocked — gets rocked. It may change, but he’s able to transfer this weighty foundation … he’s always grounded in some truth or another that he’s able to live out, that gives him a purpose for living. And now, all of that’s been taken away. Everything has been taken away.

I suppose he will continue his journey. I don’t know if he’s going to become a Buddhist or [laughs], you know, if he will go back into a life of crime, or if he will be against all things spiritual. I don’t know if he will give up his faith in spirituality or humanity … I just don’t know what will happen with this guy. That’s what so interesting … all these unanswered questions, and it could go anywhere.

Have you started work at all on season 2?
No, no we haven’t. We’ve had some initial discussions about it, but we’re all just kind of letting [the first season] settle and see how it plays out.

Boyd is a leader, too, so it’s tough to imagine he’ll be kept down, however he decides to proceed next season.
Boyd is a natural-born leader. I think his actions, in many ways, were the same. He was engaging in the same kind of behavior, post-incarceration, but his motivations for doing it were different. And when a man feels righteous, there is no limit to what he is capable of doing. Now, all that’s been taken away from him. So, I guess I would end this interview with a big question mark. [Laughs]

source: tvsquad.com

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