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Walton-Goggins.net

Your only news source for all things on actor Walton Goggins.

Category: Press

It takes a Villiger: Actor Walton Goggins launches parenting app

Between Marvel’s upcoming “Ant-Man and the Wasp” and Warner Bros.’ “Tomb Raider” remake, actor Walton Goggins (“Vice Principals,” “Justified”) has flown more than 100,000 miles in the last year for work.

That makes it challenging for him and his wife, filmmaker Nadia Conners, to take care of their 6-year-old son and find trusted, reliable sitters, tutors and music teachers. They found themselves constantly texting and calling friends for recommendations, and then turning to the internet, which turned up unvetted strangers.

So Goggins created an app, called Villiger, that’s intended to be a platform that helps like-minded parents connect, find recommendations and book support for their kids.

“My grandmother brought me up and would always tell me it takes a village to raise a child,” Goggins said in a statement. “Now I know what she meant and I am hoping that Villiger will give every parent the village they need to make parenting easier.”

The app enables parents to share sitters, set playdates, and find baseball coaches and piano teachers through the friends and neighbors who make up their “village.” Users can also receive recommendations, advice, requests and contacts within that network, and the app provides direct booking and payment for a variety of support providers including sitters, tutors, music teachers, housekeepers and more.

“Whether I’m traveling to film scenes in different cities and need support, or if I’m at home and trying to arrange a sitter for a spontaneous date night with Nadia, I can simply launch Villiger and my extended community is there, ready to recommend and book,” Goggins said. “No more texting 50 friends during their work hour or dinner time in my frantic search for help.”

With undisclosed seed funding from Nir Zohar, president of Wix; Mark Tluszcz, founding partner of VC firm Mangrove Capital; and Stephen Stokols, co-founder and CEO of FreedomPop, Villiger launches its mobile app in public beta today on iOS and Android.

The app has been in the works for about a year and employs 11 people.

Goggins elaborated via email on what Villiger brings to the market, how beta testers have used it in unexpected ways, and how he plans to monetize it.

What apps did you try before deciding to make your own?

There are no other apps in the market that allow parents to connect and recommend/share resources with each other. That’s why we decided to build Villiger. Unlike Nextdoor, which is a mass social network, we are a focused trusted recommendation and booking platform:

  1. You can actually book and pay through Villiger, like TaskRabbit.
  2. It is not open to random neighbors, but only your village, your trusted network, so this is not a mass local social network.

There are apps for finding sitters, or there are apps for finding a random handyman, etc., but there’s no app out there to get a recommended piano teacher for my son. Or ask my parent friends if they know a math tutor for my daughter. Instead, you either Google and sort through strangers, or start texting and calling people to get recommendations.

How has the app worked so far?

So far we have select beta testers on [it]. What has been interesting is that we happened to open the beta at the same time [Independent School Entrance Exam] testing for kids entering middle schools was coming up. We saw a huge surge in people looking for and recommending and booking ISEE tutors, which was an unexpected benefit. We learned that niche support like tutors and coaches is a great use case for our app, especially in L.A.

How do you plan on attracting users to Villiger?

Though marketing, viral inviting and word of mouth. The app works best when you have friends in your village, and we are seeing that the average users invites eight-plus people into his village. We are also partnering with parent groups and bloggers to promote our tool, initially focused on those in L.A.

Source: bizjournals.com

Video: Walton Goggins’ Mulholland Distilling Aims to Capture the Spirit of Los Angeles

Video: Walton Goggins’ Mulholland Distilling Aims to Capture the Spirit of Los Angeles

Walton Goggins Doesn’t Care Whether You Liked His Character on Vice Principals

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hard to those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hardto those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

Walton Goggins has long had one of the most recognizable faces in entertainment, but now he’s finally building a name for himself to match. The character actor had back-to-back standout turns in beloved dramas The Shield and Justified, and more recently joined a very exclusive club of people who have survived a Quentin Tarantino movie.

He’s also one half of the crass, awful pair of vice principals in HBO’s Vice Principals, in which Lee Russell (Goggins) and Neal Gamby (Danny McBride), are enemies-turned-friends with the sole goal of becoming the principal at a small South Carolina high school. Created by Jody Hill and McBride, who also conceived Eastbound and DownVice Principals is an often hilarious, often sad character study of two men locked in a ceaseless battle not so much with each other, but with themselves.

The show comes to an end this Sunday after two seasons, which was the plan from the beginning. For fans, and for Goggins, it’s a bittersweet ending to a show—and character—that were often deeper and more profound than their reputation would suggest. Goggins took some time out of his schedule (he’s currently filming villainous turns in two highly-anticipated blockbusters, Ant-Man and the Wasp and Tomb Raider) to talk about how the loud, fey villain Lee Russell came to be, and how the hell to relate to a character who burns down houses and compulsively lies to his wife.

The show is very funny, I swear.

Let’s start at the beginning. How did you get this role, Lee Russell?
I knew David [Gordon Green] from the independent world; I’ve known him for the better part of 13 years, 14 years. I actually read for Season Four of Eastbound and Down. I walked into this audition and there were literally five comedians from Saturday Night Live and me! I thought, “Well, this is never going to fucking happen.” But I was like, “Ah, fuck it. I don’t care. Let’s go in and let’s play.” I ultimately did not get the role. It went to [Jason] Sudeikis. And they were wise to do that.

But! Vice Principals came along and they were going back and forth about how they wanted to approach it. They thought about a traditional comedian for Lee, and then David, I think, threw out “Goggins” in the room and they all went, “He’s the fucking guy! That’s it. It’s gotta be Goggins.” So Danny reached out while I was doing The Hateful Eight and sent me the script, and I just got it.

How much of Lee Russell was written or conceived before you came into it? The weird shirts and the accent itself, and the frosted tips?
The frosted tips were there, and the first thing Danny said to me was, “Listen, you don’t have to frost your tips.” I said, “Oh yeah. Oh, I’m frosting the fucking tips.” The tips will be frosted! Hair that you see and hair that you don’t see will have tips frosted. [laughs]

I don’t know I really knew Russell until we got on the set the first day. I was full of fear. I just literally wrapped Hateful Eight at 9:30 in the morning and went straight to the airport, got on a plane, landed, got to the house and 11:30 at night. Frosted my tips and woke up at 6:00 the next morning just to become Lee Russell.

How did you approach them as lead characters, Russell and Gamby? Protagonists? They’re tonally not heroes, or even antiheroes, for that matter.
I don’t think they are. I don’t think they are protagonists. We’re exploring a side of ourselves or our society that we all know exists without giving the audience many things to cheer about. Unless you can cheer at the truths of how deeply insecure they are, and you can cheer or root for a person once you understand why they are who they are.

When I came into this, I said, “Buddy, there are things here about this guy, once you really kind of get in to him, that are very painful.” I don’t know that they anticipated it resonating or vibrating on that deeper level with me. I don’t know that they fully understood my interpretation of the depth of Lee Russell’s pain. Continue reading

Video: Walton Drops by The Rachael Ray Show

Video: Walton Drops by The Rachael Ray Show

Walton Goggins Pushes Back At Critics & Talks Season 2 Of ‘Vice Principals’

Walton Goggins Pushes Back At Critics & Talks Season 2 Of ‘Vice Principals’

Is there any chance of a Justified reboot or return? I don’t know if there are any reboots in production, but…we’ve talked about [continuing], and what that would be like. We’ve had conversations. But, it was such a fulfilling end to that journey, I think it would have to be real special for our showrunner, Graham Yost, to want to do that.

But with him or with Tim [Olyphant], I would be there, in a moment’s notice. It’s really hard to lay Boyd Crowder down and it’s hard to lay down the relationship that I had with Tim’s character, Raylan Givens. You know, I even miss saying the name…”Hello, Raylan.”

The way you just rolled it off your tongue… such relish, such fire. It meant a lot of different things at different times. It’s like, how many meanings does Sam Jackson have for “motherfucker?” It’s the same thing for “Raylan Givens.”

It would be really hard to improve on the final line, “we dug coal together.” Which was such a perfect, poetic end for a show that never tried to be fancy with its storytelling, but got to the heart of this very unique relationship. Absolutely. It wasn’t a world that was supposed to be fancy. Raylan doesn’t talk very much. He’s taciturn by nature, whereas Boyd Crowder is an eloquent, poetic killer. And a charmer.

Speaking of men who aren’t that fancy, we start the second and final season of Vice Principals with Lee having finally ascended to the throne at the school. The king! The king of all kings! [laughs] The biggest office in the building.

And he’s also remade the school in his image, which is really something. Yes, like America, know what I’m saying? [laughs] I’m joking. Yes, he has remade the school in his image, because you know, he’s a narcissist. I’m surprised he didn’t put up more mirrors.

I really like the painting [an over-the-top one of Lee that I won’t spoil here] that he has in the office. That’s one of my favorite production touches. [laughs] Me too man! When they wrote that, I just had no idea what they would really look like, and then they showed them to me for the first time, and I just could not stop laughing. But they only showed me one at a time, because in the story something happens, and there’s a new painting installed in the principal’s office. And it’s even funnier and more perfect than the first one.

How would you describe Lee’s sense of style in general? Whimsical. One of a celebration, just a rainbow of joy and happiness. Sarah Trost was our wardrobe designer, and I think it’s the first time she ever worked with Danny. And I’ll never forget the first day that I met her, and the conversation that ensued, and what she pulled out of her case. As wardrobe designers do, she fundamentally dialed into what Lee was going to be for me. I think Danny would say the same thing about her.

You know, we know a lot of people in the South—both Danny and I, and Jody and David for that matter [Editor’s Note: Jody Hill is co-creator, director and executive producer of the show, and David Gordon Green is a director and executive producer on the show; both are frequent collaborators with McBride]—that you don’t know whether they’re gay or they’re straight. You know, they’re these effeminate kind of guys in the South that are so lovely, they’re so wonderful, and this was kind of an amalgamation of a few of those people that I knew. Continue reading

Video: Walton Goggins & Danny McBride Talk ‘Vice Principals’ Season 2 with TV Guide Magazine

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