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Walton-Goggins.net

Your only news source for all things on actor Walton Goggins.

Category: Vice Principals

Emmys 2018: Walton Goggins, Hollywood’s Ultimate Journeyman, Is Finally a Breakout Star

Emmys 2018: Walton Goggins, Hollywood’s Ultimate Journeyman, Is Finally a Breakout Star

Walton Goggins delivered one of ET’s Standout Performances of the 2017-18 season.

ETOnline.com — Walton Goggins is, perhaps, Hollywood’s ultimate journeyman.

The actor, who has bounced between film and TV for the past 29 years after first appearing in a 1989 episode of The Heat of the Night, has been this way “since I was a young man,” he tells ET by phone, acknowledging, in some way, that he’s been “that guy from that show” for most of his career. In fact, to many, he has become known for supporting roles on The ShieldJustified and Sons of Anarchy — three shows that have earned Goggins critical praise and steady work if not “it” status or covers of magazines.

Then, in 2015, all of that changed thanks to, yes, another supporting role, but this time as Sheriff Chris Mannix in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight. It was his second time working with Tarantino, after an even smaller role in Django Unchained. But this time he ran away with the entire film, stealing scenes from Samuel L. Jackson and Kurt Russell.

While on set of The Hateful Eight, outside of Telluride, Colorado, Goggins was offered the opportunity to star opposite Danny McBride in Vice Principals, a new comedy marking the return of McBride, Jody Hill and David Gordon Green to HBO after four seasons of Eastbound and Down. “I read the first three scripts and I was just blown away by it,” Goggins says. “I was just grateful for the invitation to come play with them.”

Soon, he was playing Chris Mannix for Tarantino during the day and at night getting into the character of Lee Russell, a conniving and sociopathic vice principal vying for the top job at a South Carolina high school. “You know, you’re tired when you fall asleep but it’s a high-class problem, isn’t it?” Goggins says of the experience.

The show, which ran for two seasons, premiered in July 2016 to rave reviews and has since earned Goggins photo spreads in high-profile magazines as well as also roles in History Channel’s Six, this year’s big-budget films Maze Runner: The Death CureTomb Raiderand Ant-Man and the Wasp, and the lead in the CBS pilot for a new TV adaptation of L.A. Confidential.

In a conversation with ET, Goggins reflects on playing Lee Russell, the most diabolical character of his career, and how much of his career is instinct versus luck.

ET: You auditioned for Eastbound and Down and didn’t get the role. But then the opportunity to audition for Vice Principals came back around and you got that. What was it about Eastbound that wasn’t a right fit, but Vice Principals worked out?

Walton Goggins: Well, that’s really interesting. I think they were looking for something different for Eastbound and Down, and when I walked in, I knew that. At least, I felt in my heart that if I got into a room with Danny, there would be chemistry. Real chemistry. That’s what you hope with people that you look up to and it was, there was a lot of chemistry in this reading. I think by my very nature, my take on things is pretty dark. I’m not a comedian by trade. I’m just a storyteller, and most of the actors in the room when I showed up were all people from SNL and comedians. So I didn’t think I had a shot in hell of ever getting that whatsoever. It’s not really ever about that for me, it’s just about the opportunity to come play with someone you respect and admire. I think because of that reading, they were kind of going back and forth on whether or not they wanted to go darker with this particular role on Eastbound and Down. Then they made the right decision and they went with Jason Sudeikis. But in their mind, when it came to Lee Russell and when it came to Vice Principals,they wanted to go a different direction. They wanted to mine these characters for who they are, their tragedies as well as their comedic experiences.

You have had such a great track record with The Shield, Justified, Sons of Anarchy and now Vice Principals. When it comes to being involved in these projects and knowing they’re going to be so great, how much of it is instinct and how much of it is luck?

Oh, God, The Shield was luck. For sure. [Creator] Shawn Ryan had been around a little bit, but it was really his first time manning the wheel, so no one knew. But it was on the page. The same with Justified. It’s Elmore Leonard [who authored the short story on which the series is based], so we had that going with us, and the great Tim Olyphant. With all of these things, it is luck. I suppose the instinct or the gut feeling is the other part of that. I read Boyd Crowder and I just saw him immediately. I saw Shane McDonnell instantly. I saw Venus Van Dam immediately and I saw Lee Russell immediately. So I think it’s a combination of luck and just knowing when I can really add something to this or that I can help this storyteller share their story. Continue reading

‘Vice Principals’ Co-Star Walton Goggins Says His Role Was Years In The Making

‘Vice Principals’ Co-Star Walton Goggins Says His Role Was Years In The Making

Deadline.com — Walton Goggins didn’t just walk into the role of Lee Russell in HBO’s Vice Principals. Instead, it took him years to land the part. The series, co-created by Jody Hill and Goggins’ co-star Danny McBride, earned Goggins a best supporting actor Critics’ Choice Award. It wrapped its two-season run at the end of last year.

The dark comedy series centered on Neal Gamby (McBride), a prickly high school vice principal who teams with his rival Russell against the new principal who took the job they both wanted.

Goggins said Sunday during Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys event that he always wanted to work with McBride, but it took a while to find the right project. “I actually went in and I auditioned for a role on Eastbound & Down,” Goggins said of McBride’s previous HBO series.

While Goggins didn’t get that part, he did make a lasting impression on McBride. “A couple of years later, I was doing The Hateful Eight and he reached out and said, ‘I have this role and I want you to do it.’”

Goggins said it was a project he won’t soon forget.

“It was bittersweet to say goodbye to it,” Goggins said. “It was an incredible experience.”

Vice Principals: 2×09 ‘The Union of the Wizard & The Warrior’ Captures

I’ve added 190+ HD captures of Walton from the series finale of Vice Principals into the gallery.

Walton Goggins Doesn’t Care Whether You Liked His Character on Vice Principals

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hard to those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hardto those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

Walton Goggins has long had one of the most recognizable faces in entertainment, but now he’s finally building a name for himself to match. The character actor had back-to-back standout turns in beloved dramas The Shield and Justified, and more recently joined a very exclusive club of people who have survived a Quentin Tarantino movie.

He’s also one half of the crass, awful pair of vice principals in HBO’s Vice Principals, in which Lee Russell (Goggins) and Neal Gamby (Danny McBride), are enemies-turned-friends with the sole goal of becoming the principal at a small South Carolina high school. Created by Jody Hill and McBride, who also conceived Eastbound and DownVice Principals is an often hilarious, often sad character study of two men locked in a ceaseless battle not so much with each other, but with themselves.

The show comes to an end this Sunday after two seasons, which was the plan from the beginning. For fans, and for Goggins, it’s a bittersweet ending to a show—and character—that were often deeper and more profound than their reputation would suggest. Goggins took some time out of his schedule (he’s currently filming villainous turns in two highly-anticipated blockbusters, Ant-Man and the Wasp and Tomb Raider) to talk about how the loud, fey villain Lee Russell came to be, and how the hell to relate to a character who burns down houses and compulsively lies to his wife.

The show is very funny, I swear.

Let’s start at the beginning. How did you get this role, Lee Russell?
I knew David [Gordon Green] from the independent world; I’ve known him for the better part of 13 years, 14 years. I actually read for Season Four of Eastbound and Down. I walked into this audition and there were literally five comedians from Saturday Night Live and me! I thought, “Well, this is never going to fucking happen.” But I was like, “Ah, fuck it. I don’t care. Let’s go in and let’s play.” I ultimately did not get the role. It went to [Jason] Sudeikis. And they were wise to do that.

But! Vice Principals came along and they were going back and forth about how they wanted to approach it. They thought about a traditional comedian for Lee, and then David, I think, threw out “Goggins” in the room and they all went, “He’s the fucking guy! That’s it. It’s gotta be Goggins.” So Danny reached out while I was doing The Hateful Eight and sent me the script, and I just got it.

How much of Lee Russell was written or conceived before you came into it? The weird shirts and the accent itself, and the frosted tips?
The frosted tips were there, and the first thing Danny said to me was, “Listen, you don’t have to frost your tips.” I said, “Oh yeah. Oh, I’m frosting the fucking tips.” The tips will be frosted! Hair that you see and hair that you don’t see will have tips frosted. [laughs]

I don’t know I really knew Russell until we got on the set the first day. I was full of fear. I just literally wrapped Hateful Eight at 9:30 in the morning and went straight to the airport, got on a plane, landed, got to the house and 11:30 at night. Frosted my tips and woke up at 6:00 the next morning just to become Lee Russell.

How did you approach them as lead characters, Russell and Gamby? Protagonists? They’re tonally not heroes, or even antiheroes, for that matter.
I don’t think they are. I don’t think they are protagonists. We’re exploring a side of ourselves or our society that we all know exists without giving the audience many things to cheer about. Unless you can cheer at the truths of how deeply insecure they are, and you can cheer or root for a person once you understand why they are who they are.

When I came into this, I said, “Buddy, there are things here about this guy, once you really kind of get in to him, that are very painful.” I don’t know that they anticipated it resonating or vibrating on that deeper level with me. I don’t know that they fully understood my interpretation of the depth of Lee Russell’s pain. Continue reading

Vice Principals: 2×07 ‘Spring Break’ & 2×08 ‘Venetian Nights’ Captures

I’ve added 400+ HD captures of Walton from the seventh and eighth episodes of Vice Principals into the gallery.

Be sure to tune into the series finale this Sunday on HBO!


Vice Principals: 2×06 ‘The Most Popular Boy’

Vice Principals: 2×06 ‘The Most Popular Boy’

I’ve added 200+ HD captures of Walton from the latest episode of Vice Principals into the gallery.

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