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Walton-Goggins.net

Your only news source for all things on actor Walton Goggins.

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‘Deep State’: Walton Goggins To Star In Season 2 Of Fox Networks Group’s Thriller

Deadline.com — Justified and Vice Principals alum Walton Goggins will headline and executive produce the upcoming eight-episode second season of Deep State, I have learned. The spy thriller from Fox Networks Group Europe & Africa airs in 50 markets across the region.

Goggins will take over for Mark Strong, who starred in the first season. He will play Nathan Miller, a former CIA operative who now works in the private sector as a “Michael Clayton-like” fixer for the deep state. Also joining the series as new cast members are Victoria Hamilton (The Crown) as Meaghan Sullivan, a Republican U.S. senator who is determined to bring the illicit activities of the deep state to light; Lily Banda (The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind) as Aicha Konaté, a Malian aid worker intent on improving things for her country; and Shelley Conn (Liar), who plays Miller’s ex-wife.

Returning cast members for the second season include Joe Dempsie, Karima McAdams, Alistair Petrie and Anastasia Griffiths. Production takes place in South Africa, Morocco and the UK, with Season 2 set to premiere globally in 2019.

Co-created, directed and written by Matthew Parkhill (Rogue), Deep State is described as a grounded, visceral thriller that moves between the deeply personal story of a family man fighting to escape his past and the violent, dark excesses of government and global corporate power.

The first season centered on Max Easton (Strong), an ex-spy whose past comes back to haunt him when he’s summoned away from his new life in the Pyrenees by George White (Petrie), head of covert MI6/CIA team called The Section. White convinces Max to return to the field to avenge the death of his estranged son Harry. But the stakes are soon raised when Max finds himself at the heart of a covert intelligence war, immersed in a widespread conspiracy to profit from the spread of chaos in the Middle East.

The second season will expand and delve deeper into the murky world of the deep state. Having failed in the Middle East, those powers now are turning their attention to Sub-Saharan Africa and the scramble to plunder its natural resources. This is the first dirty war over clean energy. The season also will explore the origin stories of some of our favorite characters from Season 1 alongside witnessing the fall of a hero and orchestrating the making of a terrorist in the eyes of the West.

“At the heart of this project is this major new character, Nathan Miller (Goggins), an ex-CIA agent, who now acts on behalf of the deep state,” said showrunner Parkhill. “Our aim for the show is to move beyond the first season, expanding the shadowy world of the deep state and encourage viewers to delve deeper into how it goes about ruthlessly achieving its goals.”

The show, produced by Red Arrow’s Endor Productions, also airs on U.S. network Epix and has been sold to broadcasters including SBS in Australia, NBCUniversal in France, Super Channel in Canada, TVNZ in New Zealand and DRTV in Denmark.

‘L.A. Confidential’: Efforts to Find CBS Pilot a New Home Fail

HollywoodReporter.com — Lionsgate TV and New Regency’s take on the James Ellroy novel was eyed at CBS All Access but a deal could not be reached. There will be no eleventh-hour rescue for one of pilot season’s most promising dramas.

Efforts to find a new home for L.A. Confidential, originally developed for but passed over by CBS, have failed. The drama, based on the James Ellroy novel and subsequent feature film, had been eyed to land at CBS All Access, the subscription service from co-producers CBS Television Studios. However, following extended talks, a deal ultimately could not be reached.

Sources say Lionsgate TV, who produced the pilot alongside New Regency and CBS Television Studios, may have asked for a higher licensing fee than the SVOD home had expected. Others maintain that finances had little to do with it — given CBS All Access’ financial commitment to Star Trek: Discovery and the franchise’s other forthcoming series. What’s more, CBS All Access already has period drama Strange Angel, which is set in the 1930s.

L.A. Confidential revolved around three homicide detectives, a female reporter and an up-and-coming actress whose paths intersect while the detectives pursue a sadistic serial killer among the secrets and lies of glamorous and gritty 1950s Los Angeles. The drama, starring Brian J. Smith (Sense8) and Walton Goggins and written and exec produced by Jordan Harper (Gotham) and showrunner Anna Fricke, came in well but was considered darker than the traditional CBS fare. CBS All Access was considered a likely new home for the drama as co-producers CBS TV Studios continues to make a splash in streaming.

CBS picked up five new dramas for the 2018-19 broadcast season: Dick Wolf’s FBI, military drama The Code (which is undergoing recastings), Greg Berlanti and Ava DuVernay racial drama The Red Line, light drama God Friended Me (also from Berlanti) and a reboot of Magnum P.I.

Lionsgate TV and CBS TV Studios declined comment on L.A. Confidential.

Emmys 2018: Walton Goggins, Hollywood’s Ultimate Journeyman, Is Finally a Breakout Star

Emmys 2018: Walton Goggins, Hollywood’s Ultimate Journeyman, Is Finally a Breakout Star

Walton Goggins delivered one of ET’s Standout Performances of the 2017-18 season.

ETOnline.com — Walton Goggins is, perhaps, Hollywood’s ultimate journeyman.

The actor, who has bounced between film and TV for the past 29 years after first appearing in a 1989 episode of The Heat of the Night, has been this way “since I was a young man,” he tells ET by phone, acknowledging, in some way, that he’s been “that guy from that show” for most of his career. In fact, to many, he has become known for supporting roles on The ShieldJustified and Sons of Anarchy — three shows that have earned Goggins critical praise and steady work if not “it” status or covers of magazines.

Then, in 2015, all of that changed thanks to, yes, another supporting role, but this time as Sheriff Chris Mannix in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight. It was his second time working with Tarantino, after an even smaller role in Django Unchained. But this time he ran away with the entire film, stealing scenes from Samuel L. Jackson and Kurt Russell.

While on set of The Hateful Eight, outside of Telluride, Colorado, Goggins was offered the opportunity to star opposite Danny McBride in Vice Principals, a new comedy marking the return of McBride, Jody Hill and David Gordon Green to HBO after four seasons of Eastbound and Down. “I read the first three scripts and I was just blown away by it,” Goggins says. “I was just grateful for the invitation to come play with them.”

Soon, he was playing Chris Mannix for Tarantino during the day and at night getting into the character of Lee Russell, a conniving and sociopathic vice principal vying for the top job at a South Carolina high school. “You know, you’re tired when you fall asleep but it’s a high-class problem, isn’t it?” Goggins says of the experience.

The show, which ran for two seasons, premiered in July 2016 to rave reviews and has since earned Goggins photo spreads in high-profile magazines as well as also roles in History Channel’s Six, this year’s big-budget films Maze Runner: The Death CureTomb Raiderand Ant-Man and the Wasp, and the lead in the CBS pilot for a new TV adaptation of L.A. Confidential.

In a conversation with ET, Goggins reflects on playing Lee Russell, the most diabolical character of his career, and how much of his career is instinct versus luck.

ET: You auditioned for Eastbound and Down and didn’t get the role. But then the opportunity to audition for Vice Principals came back around and you got that. What was it about Eastbound that wasn’t a right fit, but Vice Principals worked out?

Walton Goggins: Well, that’s really interesting. I think they were looking for something different for Eastbound and Down, and when I walked in, I knew that. At least, I felt in my heart that if I got into a room with Danny, there would be chemistry. Real chemistry. That’s what you hope with people that you look up to and it was, there was a lot of chemistry in this reading. I think by my very nature, my take on things is pretty dark. I’m not a comedian by trade. I’m just a storyteller, and most of the actors in the room when I showed up were all people from SNL and comedians. So I didn’t think I had a shot in hell of ever getting that whatsoever. It’s not really ever about that for me, it’s just about the opportunity to come play with someone you respect and admire. I think because of that reading, they were kind of going back and forth on whether or not they wanted to go darker with this particular role on Eastbound and Down. Then they made the right decision and they went with Jason Sudeikis. But in their mind, when it came to Lee Russell and when it came to Vice Principals,they wanted to go a different direction. They wanted to mine these characters for who they are, their tragedies as well as their comedic experiences.

You have had such a great track record with The Shield, Justified, Sons of Anarchy and now Vice Principals. When it comes to being involved in these projects and knowing they’re going to be so great, how much of it is instinct and how much of it is luck?

Oh, God, The Shield was luck. For sure. [Creator] Shawn Ryan had been around a little bit, but it was really his first time manning the wheel, so no one knew. But it was on the page. The same with Justified. It’s Elmore Leonard [who authored the short story on which the series is based], so we had that going with us, and the great Tim Olyphant. With all of these things, it is luck. I suppose the instinct or the gut feeling is the other part of that. I read Boyd Crowder and I just saw him immediately. I saw Shane McDonnell instantly. I saw Venus Van Dam immediately and I saw Lee Russell immediately. So I think it’s a combination of luck and just knowing when I can really add something to this or that I can help this storyteller share their story. Continue reading

Andy Garcia, Walton Goggins Join ‘Words on Bathroom Walls’

Andy Garcia, Walton Goggins Join ‘Words on Bathroom Walls’

Charlie Plummer and AnnaSophia Robb are set to star in the high school-set drama.

HollywoodReporter.com — Andy Garcia and Walton Goggins are joining the cast of Words on Bathroom Walls.

Molly Parker is also joining the LD Entertainment project, which is set to star Charlie Plummer and AnnaSophia Robb.

Based on Julia Walton’s debut novel, the feature will follow high schooler Adam (Plummer) as he navigates life while living with paranoid schizophrenia and battling wild hallucinations, and undergoes an experimental drug trial that promises to help hide his illness from his peers.

Garcia will play Father Patrick, the kind and unexpectedly witty priest at Adam’s private high school, while Parker will play Adam’s single mother and Goggins her partner.

Thor Freudenthal will direct from a script by Nick Naveda. Mickey Liddell and Pete Shilaimon will pordcue for LD Entertainment, which is also financing the project.

Garcia, who will next be seen in Paramount comedy Book Club, is repped by CAA and Brillstien. Goggins is set for Disney/Marvel’s Ant-Man and the Wasp and is repped by ICM and Darris Hatch. Parker, who is repped by CAA, Canada’s Red and Circle of Confusion, can currently be seen on Netflix series Lost in Space.

Actor Walton Goggins Wants You to Have a Drink and Sit a Spell

Actor Walton Goggins Wants You to Have a Drink and Sit a Spell

A look inside Mulholland Distilling’s new modern-day salon in the Arts District

LAMag.com — It was the winter of 1991 when Walton Goggins arrived in Los Angeles at the invitation of a manager he’d met in Atlanta (his hometown is nearby Lithia Springs) while working on an episode of In the Heat of the Night. As soon as he set foot in the woman’s Hollywood apartment—he recalls it being on Poinsettia Place—she presented him with a contract to sign. He put her off by asking for a tour of Hollywood Boulevard, and then broke it to her that he wasn’t prepared to sign any paperwork. She told him to get out. It was late, so he negotiated a night on her couch, which she agreed to as long as he hit the bricks first thing in the morning. At the crack of dawn, he gathered his belongings and caught a taxi to an audition that wouldn’t start for hours.

“I got there at 7 o’clock, 6:30 in the morning for a 10 o’clock appointment, and just sat out on the bench with all my shit,” he recalls. “That was my first 24 hours in this city, and ever since then [L.A. has] given me so much more than it’s taken away from me, and I’ve become the person that I’ve become because of this town.”

Goggins, now 46 and recognizable for starring roles in everything from Justified to the new Tomb Raider reboot (not to mention his pathos-rich turn as sociopathic school administrator Lee Russell on HBO’s Vice Principals), tells the story over sips of a gin concoction he mixed behind the bar in his new Arts District headquarters. In late 2016, he and friend-partner Matthew Alper, a first Assistant Camera man with dozens of film credits, launched Mulholland Distilling, a liquor brand that aspires to capture the “spirit of L.A.” Alper is a second generation Angeleno, raised on the Westside, and Goggins considers himself a transplanted native, which seems fair given the lukewarm welcome he endured to live and thrive in the city.

Last month, they quietly introduced the Mulholland Room, a second-story loft they intend to be a physical extension of the brand and its identity. In theory, it’s their office. It’s a tasting room. It’s a space for private and not-so-private events (eventually). It’s a place for people to get together and share ideas. Alper calls it a “salon.” Goggins calls it a “watering hole of sorts.” In practice, it’s the airy, gorgeous living room of your L.A. dreams, complete with a fully stocked bar and some really nice art on the walls.

“I think branding in 2018 is the opposite of branding, do you know what I mean? I don’t think that you wear a T-shirt with Mulholland Distilling on it anymore,” Goggins says. “It’s really about well, no. We’re here right now, and let’s pour a beautiful cocktail, and let’s sit and talk. I think our goal was to cultivate an experience where people could come and bond and share ideas, really, regardless of where you are in your life or what your occupation is.”

Currently, it’s accessible via text message to a number on a card being handed out by Alper and Goggins to friends and friends of friends. In the future, they envision opening it up for some more public gatherings, like an industry night, where bartenders can come, hangout, and experiment behind the bar.

Goggins’s personal aesthetic is represented in nearly every detail of the space. Amid the cushy, vintage sofas and chairs are pieces from the actor’s own collection, including a French club chair he bought when he started getting real work 20 years ago. The wall opposite the bar features a large-scale painting by Goggins’s friend Danny Fox; near the entryway, there’s also a Wes Lang painting of Willie Nelson and Stefanie Schneider photographs of the desert on L.A.’s outskirts.

The cool, inviting marble-topped bar is the heart of the space. Mulholland’s spirits—a New World gin, a whiskey, and a vodka—are distilled elsewhere, but finished to their specifications. The whiskey is distilled in Indiana, and then transported to Kentucky where it is blended with a high rye bourbon, so it’s 94 percent corn, four percent rye, and two percent barley. “It’s sweet up front and caramel-y, and then has a nice rye spice finish and a little bit of heat at the end,” Alper says. “Just to remind you that you’re drinking whiskey.” The vodka, made from non-GMO corn so it’s gluten free, is distilled six times, which gives it a sweeter flavor; a higher proof gives it a softer mouth-feel. The gin is the standout. Finished with notes of lime, lavender, and Japanese cucumber, it’s simultaneously fruity, herbal, and vegetal, without being alienating to people who don’t normally drink gin.

Alper refers to them as “egalitarian spirits.” They’re accessible in terms of taste, and they’re relatively inexpensive, too.

“That’s the whole thing,” Alper says. “It’s a reflection of who we are. I think it’s accessible, it’s delicious; the bartender’s really attracted to it because it’s new and different. People who’ve never had it before are attracted to it because it’s not scary and it’s not some off-the-path sort of thing.”

Goggins adds, “It’s not the greatest whiskey you’ve ever had in your entire life, and it’s not meant to be. It’s meant to be accessible but beautiful, and a very high quality.”

For more info or to host a private event at the Mulholland Room, contact them via their website

‘Vice Principals’ Co-Star Walton Goggins Says His Role Was Years In The Making

‘Vice Principals’ Co-Star Walton Goggins Says His Role Was Years In The Making

Deadline.com — Walton Goggins didn’t just walk into the role of Lee Russell in HBO’s Vice Principals. Instead, it took him years to land the part. The series, co-created by Jody Hill and Goggins’ co-star Danny McBride, earned Goggins a best supporting actor Critics’ Choice Award. It wrapped its two-season run at the end of last year.

The dark comedy series centered on Neal Gamby (McBride), a prickly high school vice principal who teams with his rival Russell against the new principal who took the job they both wanted.

Goggins said Sunday during Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys event that he always wanted to work with McBride, but it took a while to find the right project. “I actually went in and I auditioned for a role on Eastbound & Down,” Goggins said of McBride’s previous HBO series.

While Goggins didn’t get that part, he did make a lasting impression on McBride. “A couple of years later, I was doing The Hateful Eight and he reached out and said, ‘I have this role and I want you to do it.’”

Goggins said it was a project he won’t soon forget.

“It was bittersweet to say goodbye to it,” Goggins said. “It was an incredible experience.”

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