Jan 20, 2018

It takes a Villiger: Actor Walton Goggins launches parenting app

Jan 20, 2018

It takes a Villiger: Actor Walton Goggins launches parenting app

Between Marvel’s upcoming “Ant-Man and the Wasp” and Warner Bros.’ “Tomb Raider” remake, actor Walton Goggins (“Vice Principals,” “Justified”) has flown more than 100,000 miles in the last year for work.

That makes it challenging for him and his wife, filmmaker Nadia Conners, to take care of their 6-year-old son and find trusted, reliable sitters, tutors and music teachers. They found themselves constantly texting and calling friends for recommendations, and then turning to the internet, which turned up unvetted strangers.

So Goggins created an app, called Villiger, that’s intended to be a platform that helps like-minded parents connect, find recommendations and book support for their kids.

“My grandmother brought me up and would always tell me it takes a village to raise a child,” Goggins said in a statement. “Now I know what she meant and I am hoping that Villiger will give every parent the village they need to make parenting easier.”

The app enables parents to share sitters, set playdates, and find baseball coaches and piano teachers through the friends and neighbors who make up their “village.” Users can also receive recommendations, advice, requests and contacts within that network, and the app provides direct booking and payment for a variety of support providers including sitters, tutors, music teachers, housekeepers and more.

“Whether I’m traveling to film scenes in different cities and need support, or if I’m at home and trying to arrange a sitter for a spontaneous date night with Nadia, I can simply launch Villiger and my extended community is there, ready to recommend and book,” Goggins said. “No more texting 50 friends during their work hour or dinner time in my frantic search for help.”

With undisclosed seed funding from Nir Zohar, president of Wix; Mark Tluszcz, founding partner of VC firm Mangrove Capital; and Stephen Stokols, co-founder and CEO of FreedomPop, Villiger launches its mobile app in public beta today on iOS and Android.

The app has been in the works for about a year and employs 11 people.

Goggins elaborated via email on what Villiger brings to the market, how beta testers have used it in unexpected ways, and how he plans to monetize it.

What apps did you try before deciding to make your own?

There are no other apps in the market that allow parents to connect and recommend/share resources with each other. That’s why we decided to build Villiger. Unlike Nextdoor, which is a mass social network, we are a focused trusted recommendation and booking platform:

  1. You can actually book and pay through Villiger, like TaskRabbit.
  2. It is not open to random neighbors, but only your village, your trusted network, so this is not a mass local social network.

There are apps for finding sitters, or there are apps for finding a random handyman, etc., but there’s no app out there to get a recommended piano teacher for my son. Or ask my parent friends if they know a math tutor for my daughter. Instead, you either Google and sort through strangers, or start texting and calling people to get recommendations.

How has the app worked so far?

So far we have select beta testers on [it]. What has been interesting is that we happened to open the beta at the same time [Independent School Entrance Exam] testing for kids entering middle schools was coming up. We saw a huge surge in people looking for and recommending and booking ISEE tutors, which was an unexpected benefit. We learned that niche support like tutors and coaches is a great use case for our app, especially in L.A.

How do you plan on attracting users to Villiger?

Though marketing, viral inviting and word of mouth. The app works best when you have friends in your village, and we are seeing that the average users invites eight-plus people into his village. We are also partnering with parent groups and bloggers to promote our tool, initially focused on those in L.A.

Source: bizjournals.com

Sep 11, 2017

Walton Cast in Thriller ‘Them That Follow’

Sep 11, 2017

Walton Cast in Thriller ‘Them That Follow’

Walton Goggins has been set to star in Them That Follow, the dramatic thriller taking shape for a production start next month in Ohio. He joins Olivia Colman, Alice Englert and Thomas Mann in the Amasia Entertainment pic, set deep in the wilds of Appalachia where believers handle death-dealing snakes to prove themselves before God.

Goggins will play Lemuel Childs, the unshakable preacher determined to protect this way of life in a world that is changing and turning against their traditions. Fearing the erosion of his church and the possible loss of his daughter Mara (Englert) to the outside world, he is faced with preventing his community from breaking apart.

Brittany Poulton and Daniel Savage are directing from their original screenplay. Bradley Gallo and Michael Helfant will produce for Amasia with Gerard Butler, Alan Siegel and Danielle Robinson for G-BASE. Amasia is financing.

It’s a busy time for Goggins, who stars alongside Richard Gere and Peter Dinklage in Three Christs, the Jon Avnet pic that is world premiering Thursday at the Toronto Film Festival. He also stars opposite Alicia Vikander in Warner Bros’ Tomb Raider reboot, Disney/Marvel’s Ant Man And The Wasp and Fox’s Maze Runner: The Death Cure all due out next year. His HBO series Vice Principals opposite Danny McBride returns for Season 2 on Sunday.

Source: deadline.com

Jan 31, 2017

Entertainment Weekly: Sneak peek of Walton Goggins as he plots his escape on ‘SIX’

Jan 31, 2017

Entertainment Weekly: Sneak peek of Walton Goggins as he plots his escape on ‘SIX’

History’s new military drama Six debuted strongly in mid-January, with 2.6 total million viewers tuning in to check out the combat series. The show focuses on the struggles of a Navy SEAL team, and on their former trooper leader “Rip” Taggart (Justified‘s Walton Goggins), who was taken captive in the premiere by extremist group Boko Haram. While his former compatriots struggle to free him, on Wednesday’s episode, Rip will try to escape his captors.

EW has some exclusive photos from the episode, titled “Tour of Duty.” Things look bad for Goggins, though the situation still seems more hopeful than The Hateful Eight.

The third episode of Six‘s eight-part season airs Wednesday at 10 p.m. on History.

Source: ew.com

Jan 13, 2017

Walton Goggins On Why He Doesn’t Want His New Navy SEAL Drama ‘Six’ To ‘Be A Piece Of Propaganda’

Jan 13, 2017

Walton Goggins On Why He Doesn’t Want His New Navy SEAL Drama ‘Six’ To ‘Be A Piece Of Propaganda’

What was your read on the character when you first encountered the material? He seems to square with the morally suspect types that you often play.

You know, I had a conversation with the creators immediately — there wasn’t a lot of time after I replaced another actor who was in that role, so I didn’t have a lot of time to really make my decision. I just said, “I’m not interested in being used as a piece of propaganda for American war policy.” Honoring the struggles of these men and women outside of the context of the country that they’re fighting for — I want to speak to them. I want to tell their story. I feel like that’s what they had written, and they said, “That’s exactly what we want to do when it comes to you.” They gave me a seat at the table and we had this beautiful collaboration over eight episodes, and it was one of the greatest experiences of my life, to be quite honest with you.

Your statement about not wanting this to be military propaganda is interesting. What exactly did you have in mind when you said that?

Well, I think that there are ways of telling stories like this that are about a true honoring or celebration of sacrifice for the people that we, America, ask to defend our country on a daily basis. I think there’s a time for that, there’s a place for that — then there’s also a place for not making it about you. What I mean by that is, by not making it about just America. Not having it be about you, [but] having it be about these people independent of you and looking at them and understanding really what it is they’re going through without just a cursory pat on the back saying, “Thank you for your service.”

Do you feel like Six has a political perspective, in terms of being anti-war or critical of American foreign policy?

No, I don’t, which I think is its saving grace. There is no political soapbox that it’s standing on, one way or the other. It’s not for or against anything. It is just with a microscope, dissecting the experience of [war]. I think that that’s the best way to reach anybody. In our volatile political system right now, I don’t think anybody wants to talk about it anymore, whatever side you’re on. I certainly don’t. I’m ready to get past it and look at individuals and look at their struggle and tell stories from that point of view.

I don’t want to divulge any spoilers, so let’s just say your character goes through quite a physical ordeal. Was this a hard shoot? Was it as hard to shoot as it to watch?

It was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done in my life. I think there’s not a person that you would speak to that was involved in this project that wouldn’t say the same thing. For me, it was a process of being incarcerated for 15 hours a day and getting hit all day, every day, with my hands tied behind my back, man. I know, just in my imagination, how demoralizing and dehumanizing that is, and I’m just an actor, man — who can get a cappuccino if I needed to. But people have and probably will continue to have this experience. This experience is, on a number of levels, translated in a number of different ways, but it was very, very, very difficult. Mentally very difficult. Physically, the most difficult thing I’ve ever done.

I wanted to ask about Harvey and Bob Weinstein, who are executive producers of Six, and also were involved in the films you made with Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight. Was it their idea to get you involved in Six?

Yeah, I got a phone call from Harvey and he said, “Walton, I need you, man, and the story needs you.” I can’t tell you what it feels like for an actor to be at a restaurant with Harvey Weinstein, let alone get an incoming phone call from a man of his stature. It meant a great deal to me and I care for the man deeply and I took what he said to heart, you know, and answered that call. Not solely because of that, but because of that and because of Bill [Broyles] and Bruce [McKenna] and David [Broyles], and this cast, and this network. The History Channel really wanted to do something that they hadn’t done before, and to be bold in this next step.

Most importantly, I wanted to honor the people that have made this commitment. You know, I come from the South, man, and I would say that seven out of my 10 friends growing up all went into the service. It’s just what you did. My education lay elsewhere, and I went out West when all of my buddies went East in the Gulf War. I heard them. I’ve heard what it was like for them — even those that didn’t see battle, what it was like for them.

It was a real opportunity to say thank you. I hope in “insert-airport-terminal anywhere in the world” going forward, that they will come up and they’ll say, “Hey, man, thank you for giving a sh*t. Thank you for caring.”

Source: uproxx.com

Dec 7, 2016

‘Tomb Raider’ Reboot Casts Walton Goggins as Villain Opposite Alicia Vikande

Dec 7, 2016

‘Tomb Raider’ Reboot Casts Walton Goggins as Villain Opposite Alicia Vikande

Walton Goggins is in final negotiations to join Warner Bros, MGM and GK Films reboot of “Tomb Raider,” the latest adaptation of the popular video game starring Alicia Vikander as the iconic character Lara Croft.

WB recently announced the pic would be released on March 16, 2018 with Norwegian director Roar Uthaug helming.

Goggins would play the antagonist in the film.

MGM joined the project in 2013, acquiring rights to the popular video game to develop the feature in partnership with Graham King’s GK Films. King, who acquired “Tomb Raider” in 2011 from Square Enix, will serve as producer.

The original “Tomb Raider” video game was released in 1996 by London-based Eidos, which is now part of Square Enix. The games have sold over 35 million units. Square Enix released a reboot in 2013 with a younger Croft (age 21) being sent off on her first big adventure amid amped-up action and set pieces.

Paramount’s two films starring Angelina Jolie as the British archaeologist were released in 2001 and 2003 and grossed $432 million worldwide.

Warner Bros. will co-produce the pic with MGM and GK Films.

Goggins has already had a busy year on the TV front with his HBO series “Vice Principals” which just wrapped its first season and was renewed for a second. On the film side he was most recently seen in Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight” and also has the Seal Team Six History Channel series “Six” bowing next year.

He is repped by ICM Partners and Darris Hatch Management.

Source: Variety.com

Oct 25, 2016

Navy SEAL Drama ‘SIX’ Gets Premiere Date at History

Oct 25, 2016

Navy SEAL Drama ‘SIX’ Gets Premiere Date at History

History’s highly anticipated Navy SEAL drama, SIX — led by Justified favorite Walton Goggins — will begin its mission on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, the cable network announced, while also releasing a cast photo.

Inspired by real missions and promising to “authentically capture the inside world of America’s elite Special Operations unit,” SIX‘s eight-episode first season follows members of Navy SEAL Team Six, whose covert mission to eliminate a Taliban leader in Afghanistan goes awry when they uncover a U.S. citizen working with terrorists.

The series opens with troop leader Richard “Rip” Taggart (played by Goggins) making a questionable decision while on a mission in Afghanistan. Two years later, Rip is captured by Boko Haram, Nigeria’s militant Islamist group, and it’s up to his former SEAL Team Six brothers — played by Jaylen Moore (Homeland), Kyle Schmid (Copper), Barry Sloane (Revenge), Juan Pablo Raba (Narcos), Edwin Hodge (Chicago Fire) and Donny Boaz (The Great Debaters) — to put their differences aside to locate and rescue their onetime leader.

SIX also stars Dominic Adams (Devious Maids), Brianne Davis (Jarhead), Nadine Velazquez (Flight), and Nondumiso Tembe (True Blood).

Source: TVLine.com

Jul 15, 2016

Vanity Fair: TV’s Favorite Villain, Walton Goggins, On Braces, Pratfalls, and ‘Vice Principals’

Jul 15, 2016

Vanity Fair: TV’s Favorite Villain, Walton Goggins, On Braces, Pratfalls, and ‘Vice Principals’

V.F.com: Hi! How are you?

Walton Goggins: It’s good being back in California. I’ve been in North Carolina for like two months as a prisoner of war. Fuck, man! It’s been very . . . Wow. God, what a tough experience. We’re not here to talk about that. How are you?

I’m great! I’ve seen the first six episodes of Vice Principals!

Wow, the first six? Fantastic. Season 1 is about who these people are, and Season 2 is why they are who they are. It’s tough to be that fucking mean. Lee Russell is way meaner than Boyd Crowder. He comes around.

You’ve always been hilarious on Justified, and Sons of Anarchy but would you consider this your first full-blown comedy?

I do, yeah, even though Danny, and Jody, and David Gordon Green would say that they only make dramas that happen to be funny. Once you look at this in the spring semester—because it really is a fall semester and a spring semester, and it’s one story, it’s one piece with different movements to it. It’s pretty fucking dark in a satiating way, and, hopefully, I think it’s funny.

Were you nervous at all to dive fully into the comedy genre?

I was studying Vice Principals while I was doing The Hateful Eight, and I got on a plane the day that we wrapped. After a 24-hour day I went straight to the airport and jumped on a plane, and landed in Charleston, and at ten o’clock at night went home and got my hair dyed. I got my tips done until one o’clock in the morning, and started work at six o’clock the next morning.

I was as intimidated as anything I’ve ever done, and in some ways probably more so because the idea of improv-ing with Danny McBride was—fuck, man—I just couldn’t sleep at night. He’s so smart, and their humor is so specific. I didn’t want to let him down; I didn’t want to let HBO down. It’s a lot to step into that ring with the roughhouse boys and how they do their things. Kenny Powers is an iconic character, and to play at that level I think would be intimidating for anybody.

How much improvising did you wind up doing?

Daily. All day long. That was the hardest part of this entire experience for me, I think for both of us, was containing the laughter. You just look at Bill Murray. It’s Meatballs! That’s my guy! That was really the hardest part. We would go on these tangents that would take us in places that were sublime, but then we would always come back to the text. Most of it is as it was scripted, as Danny wrote.

What about the physical comedy? Was that a new muscle that you had to learn?

I would be curious to hear what a comedian has to say about that, because I don’t look at it in those terms. If I thought about it as, “I need to be physically funny,” then I don’t think that I could have done it. I think I would have been too self-conscious. It’s no different than Boyd Crowder, or [The Hateful Eight’s] Chris Mannix, or [Sons of Anarchy’s] Venus Van Dam, or anybody else. It’s just, if you’re true to who this person is, and you understand who this person is, and they are an authentic human being in the world, a heightened, at times, person in the world, then the way that they walk, and the way that they talk, and they way that they interact, all of that is a part of it, is a part of the situation that lives in your imagination.

You talked about Kenny Powers being an iconic character. You auditioned for Eastbound and Down, right? Which role?

I auditioned for the role that Jason Sudeikis wound up getting. I had braces on at the time, and I had just wrapped a season of Justified. I took that time to take care of some personal business, and I had these braces on and I wasn’t taking a job for four or five months. So I got these braces on my teeth and then they called and it was like, “Fuck it, I’m not taking the braces off, I need to get my teeth fixed. I’ve been putting this off a long time, so fuck it, he’ll love it.”

I walked into this room with my braces on, and my fucking shorts on, and some white tube socks. I walked in and there were me and four comedians from Saturday Night Live, and it was like, “Well, this is never going to happen.” That’s Jason, that’s so-and-so, this is crazy. I had a great time, and we had a lot of chemistry. I just talked to him philosophically about Kenny Powers and what that means. What does Kenny Powers mean, from my own fanboy opinion.

He tolerated my opinion, and we actually really got along. I had always wanted to work with Danny. I’ve been a fan of his ever since The Foot Fist Way,, and I thought that I got his comedy and that we could do something really unique together. I always wanted to just jump in the sandbox with him. That was the treat. Even though the opportunity didn’t ultimately happen at that stage, it was still a fucking thrill to be in the room with him and to go through his story. I just think Eastbound and Down* was one of the most exciting, dangerous comedies to come out in a very long time. Continue Reading →

Jul 15, 2016

LA Times: Walton Goggins is out for laughs, not blood, in HBO’s ‘Vice Principals’

Jul 15, 2016

LA Times: Walton Goggins is out for laughs, not blood, in HBO’s ‘Vice Principals’


Walton Goggins celebrated last holiday season as part of “The Hateful Eight,” Quentin Tarantino’s brutal western involving a pair of bounty hunters, a female fugitive, a band of outlaws and others holed up at a stagecoach lodge. By the final reel, Goggins, as the racist incoming sheriff of a town called Red Rock, was neck deep in bloody mayhem.

The role in many respects was an extension of a gallery of multidimensional bad guys Goggins has played since his breakthrough as a member of a rogue police unit in the landmark FX drama “The Shield.”

Armed with a wide smile that is simultaneously disarming and sinister, Goggins has stamped his smooth-yet-charming menace on many other projects, including “Justified” and Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” He also surprised viewers with his humorous but poignant portrayal of the transgender character Venus Van Dam on the biker drama “Sons of Anarchy.”

On Sunday, Goggins goes from “The Hateful Eight” to a “hateful two” in HBO’s “Vice Principals,” in which high school administrators Lee Russell and Neal Gamby (Goggins and Danny McBride), who despise each other, join forces to bring down their new boss, the outwardly pleasant Dr. Belinda Brown (Kimberly Hebert Gregory).

“Vice Principals,” created by McBride and Jody Hill as a follow-up to their previous HBO comedy “Eastbound & Down,” is a revelation for Goggins watchers, representing both his first major lead and a distinct change of pace — the only body part he’s taking aim at this time is the funny bone.

But just because Goggins is showing a lighter side doesn’t mean he’s fooling around.

“While I haven’t done an outright comedy, I don’t think Danny and Jody make comedies,” Goggins, 44, said recently. “I think they make dramas that happen to be funny. [Danny] did not want to hire a comedian to go on this journey with him. He wanted to hire an actor who has been given an opportunity to be funny in a lot of dramas. And we do have a real chemistry together.” Continue Reading →

Jul 15, 2016

Vulture: Walton Goggins on 25 Years of Playing ‘That Guy’

Jul 15, 2016

Vulture: Walton Goggins on 25 Years of Playing ‘That Guy’

“Can you believe I have a fucking pool?”

Walton Goggins is showing me the lush backyard of his 1922 French Tudor home in the Hollywood Hills on a hot June afternoon in Los Angeles. Even after living in the house for five years, he still can’t believe he actually lives here. “I mean, this pool was carved into the mountain,” says Goggins, whose lingering Georgia accent infuses every declaration with the earnestness of a Southern preacher. “I’ve been gone a lot lately, so anytime we’re all together as a family, we’re out here. It’s our own little paradise, you know?”

As Goggins takes our tour inside, we are greeted by his cherubic 5-year-old son, Augustus, and wife, writer-director Nadia Conners, who kisses Goggins newly bearded face — a makeover due to his upcoming role in History Channel’s Navy Seal drama Six, filming in North Carolina — before she rushes off to a meeting. “I wake up every morning with one of the smartest people I have ever met,” he gushes about Conners. “I have unfettered access to her brain; a very specific, all-encompassing worldview every single day. I’m truly the luckiest son of a bitch in Hollywood.”

To call him lucky in Hollywood would be to skip past the 25 years he’s spent playing That Guy. He logged countless supporting roles in indie films (The Apostle), studio movies (Cowboys & Aliens), and cable dramas (The Shield, Justified) before finding a crazy fan in Quentin Tarantino. The director shifted Goggins’s career into overdrive by casting him in 2012’s Django Unchained and in last year’s The Hateful Eight, telling Vulture last fall, “Watching him for six years [on Justified] do faux-Quentin dialogue let me know that he’s got the right kind of tongue.”

This week, Goggins, 45, returns to TV for his biggest (and most ridiculous) role yet in HBO’s latest entry from Eastbound & Down creators Danny McBride and Jody Hill, Vice Principals — an 18-episode, two-season comedy about two Southern high-school administrators, Lee and Neal (Goggins and McBride, respectively), who channel their loathing for each other into taking down the school principal. Goggins spoke with Vulture about how growing up poor and as an only child in the South led him to acting, how he fought his way into Hollywood, and why he “loves” Harvey Weinstein.

What appealed to you about HBO’s Vice Principals?
I truly think Danny McBride is Woody Allen for fly-over America. But Vice Principals isn’t as adolescent as Eastbound & Bound. But then again, remember the end of Eastbound’s first season when Kenny Powers leaves his girlfriend at the convenience store? Shit! Kenny is a fucking flawed human being. That’s why it all works. And Danny and Jody are always walking that line. I really believe what they do is sublime. Vice Principals also gets fucking dark. Dark and deep.

It’s also arguably the most over-the-top comedic material you’ve ever done. Is it a different exercise for you playing a part like this?
I actually feel like I’ve been doing comedy forever. The Shield was actually one of the funniest shows on television. Justified was another level of comedic intelligence. It was Elmore Leonard–sophisticated humor.

Elmore wrote the way we wish people really spoke.
Yeah, exactly. And Quentin does the same thing. His sense of humor feels like it can take place inside a bar or at the Met Museum. Similarly, Danny’s sense of humor is as adolescent as you can get, but when you look behind the curtain, there’s a lot going on. It’s extremely sophisticated.

How does it feel, after 25 years in Hollywood, to no longer be struggling or be seen only as “that Southern guy with the spiky hair?” I mean, you’re on Quentin Tarantino’s actor roster now.
It’s incredible, but mostly a total fucking relief not having to work so hard just to get a seat at the table. Playing Boyd Crowder [in Justified] was actually a real cross to bear for me personally; he was a real mantle I was carrying for a long time, and in order to rise above the stereotypical portrayal of Southern people as …

Rednecks and white trash.
Yeah. I’m proud of Boyd because I feel like I was able to educate people in urban areas about the struggles that people have in rural America. And then to have moments, like I did at Comic-Con for Django, where I’m sitting on the dais with Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Samuel L. Jackson, and just like, How the fuck did I get here? What is happening right now? I’ve had a lot of those in my career: “moments of manifestation,” I call them. Doing Shanghai Noon with Owen Wilson was one of those. Bottle Rocket was one of my favorite movies, and as soon as I saw it I thought, “I’m just gonna focus on this dude. I want to work with this guy.” And I did.

So Bottle Rocket comes out in 1996 while you’re in L.A. still looking for your big break as an actor. How did you pay the bills?
Well, first I refused to work in a restaurant. [Laughs.] Nothing against waiters and waitresses, but I couldn’t do it. I didn’t want to be that actor in L.A. having conversations with other actors about acting. I usually run away from those things. I generally don’t hang out with actors in between takes. I’m an only child, so I’ve always been off in a corner somewhere. I think it’s actually taken some learning to know how to be around other people. But the one thing I never had a problem with was listening. My mother was a great listener. And so I never had to compete for her attention because I was an only child.

What did your parents do for work when you were growing up?
My mother made $12,000 a year working for the State of Georgia in Workers Comp. My father sold insurance. But my parents divorced when I was 3. He and I had an on-off relationship for most of my life. So growing up it was me, my mom, and father’s father, oddly enough. He was the one consistent male figure in my life. I was the apple of his eye. I was mostly raised by extraordinary, highly dysfunctional, crazy Southern women. My mother’s mother was an actress in New Orleans in the 1930s. She met my grandfather and moved to Warm Springs, Georgia, and he was good friends with Franklin Delano Roosevelt. He had a thousand acres growing peaches and pulpwood. They had this beautiful life, and my mother and her three sisters were born into it. My mother remembers Roosevelt stopping in the yard saying, “Hiya, neighbor!” Then they went from this incredible cultured bucolic life to my grandfather dying from diabetes in my mother’s arms when she was 14. Then the house burned down, my grandmother went insane. She was a nurse and got addicted to amphetamines because of the grief of losing her husband and raising four girls ages 4 to 17. It’s a passel of amazing fucking stories. I had a front row seat to the real Steel Magnolias. But we were all fucking black sheep.

Who first introduced to you to the arts and performing?
Another aunt of mine wound up being a publicist for B.B. King, Phyllis Diller, and Wolfman Jack. But because my mom had me when she was 23, after they had lost everything, all we really had arts-wise was a lot of storytelling. Our family time was never about TV or cinema. And a whole bunch of her friends were always stopping by. There was a dude named Rabbit who was a locksmith and a small-time pot dealer who’d park his van in our yard, open our windows, and use our electricity to make his keys. Another dude named Be-Bop was also always there. He gave me my first job —selling hope chests for young girls who wanted to get married. [Laughs.]

Did you act at all in high school?
No, but I grew up watching another aunt perform on stage from the time I was 6. I stayed with her while she was doing dinner theater, and I’d see these beautiful women changing backstage, the whole life, the bohemian lifestyle, the reaction from the audience and thought, “I want to do that. It’s very powerful.” So I went to this casting director’s office in Atlanta, a woman named Chez Griffin — I didn’t have an appointment, so my mother drove me down there, I was only 14 — and I knocked on her door and said, “I want to talk to Chez. My name is Walton Sanders Goggins Jr. I don’t need an appointment. Just tell her.” And she came out and said, “Okay, who is this kid?” I told her, “I don’t know how to do this, but I know that I’ve had an interesting life, and I know that I feel things deeply. With some guidance and help, I can do this.” And she said okay. Then I started working in Georgia, and did a movie in 1990 called Murder in Mississippi.

Continue Reading at Vulture.com

Jun 13, 2015

Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Hateful Eight’ Gets Release Date

Jun 13, 2015

Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Hateful Eight’ Gets Release Date

Hateful Eight is storming into theaters on Christmas Day.

Quentin Tarantino’s newest film is set for a limited debut on Dec. 25 in 70mm format and will hit theaters nationwide on Jan. 8 in digital release, The Weinstein Co. said on Friday.

The Civil War-era Western joins a crowded holiday frame that includes Dec. 25 wide releases for Sony’s Will Smith NFL drama Concussion, Warner Bros.’ Point Break remake and Open Road’s Oliver Stone-directed drama Snowden. And Disney’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens will be continuing its run after a Dec. 18 debut.

Tarantino wrote and directed Hateful Eight, which includes Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Dern, Demian Bichir and Jennifer Jason Leigh among its cast. The filmmaker’s last drama, Django Unchained, opened on Dec. 25, 2012, en route to earning more than $400 million globally and a best picture Oscar nomination.

Source: hollywoodreporter.com