Feb 9, 2015

‘Justified’s’ Walton Goggins to Star in HBO’s ‘Vice Principals’

Feb 9, 2015

‘Justified’s’ Walton Goggins to Star in HBO’s ‘Vice Principals’

Congratulations Walton!

4th Annual Critics' Choice Television Awards - Red Carpet HBO has found Danny McBride’s other vice principal.

Justified star Walton Goggins has nabbed the co-lead in HBO’s straight-to-series comedy Vice Principals, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. Additionally, Boardwalk Empire alum Shea Whigham — currently co-starring on ABC’s Agent Carter — will return to HBO with a supporting role in the comedy.
Created by Eastbound & Down duo McBride and Jody Hill, Vice Principals tells the story of a high school and the people who almost run it, the vice principals. McBride stars as Neal Gamby, the divorced vice principal in charge of discipline at the school.

Goggins, who is currently wrapping the final season of FX critical darling Justified, will co-star as Lee Russell, the vice principal of curriculum at Lincoln High who is a conniving politician that enters into an unholy alliance with Gamby.

Goggins — who earned an Emmy nomination for his role as Justified’s Boyd Crowder, has also recurred on FX’s Sons of Anarchy. Vice Principals will mark his first series regular gig in a comedy series. His upcoming feature slate includes The Hateful Eight and This Is All of Us, which he also exec produces. He’s repped by ICM Partners and Darris Hatch Management.

Whigham is set as Ray Liptrapp, the new husband of Gamby’s ex, and frequent target of his hostility — despite being a genuine and supportive guy. Whigham, who played Eli Thompson on Boardwalk, is recurring on ABC’s midseason Marvel drama Agent Carter. He also recently did two episodes of HBO’s True Detective and has feature credits including The Wolf of Wall Street, American Hustle and Silver Linings Playbook. He’s repped by CAA, DBA and Morris Yorn.

Source: hollywoodreporter

Nov 12, 2014

‘Sons of Anarchy’: Walton Goggins talks Venus and Tig’s heart-to-heart

Nov 12, 2014

‘Sons of Anarchy’: Walton Goggins talks Venus and Tig’s heart-to-heart

Make sure you check out Walton’s interview in full over at EW.com – It’s a wonderful and insightful read. 🙂

EW: Venus and Tig’s heart-to-heart follows Jarry and Chibs’ combative love scene. It made me realize that while I understand Jarry’s and Chibs’ motivations as characters, I don’t want to relate to their volatile relationship. And then you have Venus, who is the most singular person on the show, and yet at this point, she really is the most relatable. What did you see in that conversation between Venus and Tig?
Goggins:
I’m just blown away that you said that, and I know Kurt [Sutter] would be blown away as well and very grateful for that comment. I think that there’s something about two people that are looking for love from an honest and truthful place that is extremely appealing. Vulnerability that is not trying to be used in some manipulative way is something that we’re all attracted to and that we aspire to, I think, whenever we’re able to truly let our guards down. And that’s really what that is: It’s not gender specific. It’s more than a man and a woman, or a man and a man, or a woman and a woman. It’s just about two human beings who need to be seen, and that’s what Kurt wrote. He gave both of these people the words to articulate how they feel. When I read it, I just thought I’ve never really seen honesty in that way, with what is a perceived way of life that would be unacceptable to another person. Venus is understanding of that, and in some ways, accepting of the limitations of that kind of commitment from another person. And she is graceful enough to let him out, but she was also vulnerable enough to say, “But I let myself believe in it, and I do believe in it. And I’m not a fool for allowing myself space for that emotion. I’m a better person for it.” Because she was able to say that, Tig came around. I mean, I’m gonna cry right now talking about it. It was so organic and so beautiful, and that comes from the mind and really from the heart of Kurt Sutter.

I assume it was scripted for you to not use Venus’ voice in that scene since Tig, at the end, asks to hear her lilt again. Is that the case?
That was Kurt, and that was in the stage directions. Paris Barclay directed this episode. Paris has been a friend of mine well over 18 years. He did episodes of The Shield. I did a movie for him back when I was like 23 years old called The Cherokee Kid. I did NYPD Blue with Paris. I’ve known Paris for a long time. Obviously I’ve known Kurt for a very long time. And Kim I’ve known for a while. That it was this collaboration between these people who have been in each other’s lives just made it all the sweeter. It was just about creating the space for this to happen. In that moment, Paris said, “Walton, I think you have to even go deeper without Venus’ voice.” Which was so strange for me because I don’t look at it as “Venus’ voice,” that’s just the way she talks. To think about her sounding other than how she sounds, that was hard for me. It was really difficult. It was like, okay, let’s bring it down, and then it just made it even sweeter for me. I think it made it sweeter for Kim as Tig.

When we walked into do it and rehearse it, I’d just gotten back from filming a movie in Canada. I’d been back for not even 24 hours. I got off the plane, went home and slept, woke up six hours later to start the process. By the time we got to start shooting [the conversation], it was like six o’clock at night. We’d done the other stuff beforehand, and Kim really wanted to approach the making love scene in the montage in a very certain way. He was absolutely right, and I thought that was beautiful. And then [Venus] coming out of the shower, I really talked to Tracey [Anderson], our makeup artist, about where we are in the stage—what is right and what’s not right. And we did that scene, and Paris staged it so that Venus was looking in a mirror at herself at the end. For me, all the sudden for the first time, Venus is looking at herself and judging herself. She’s looking at herself for the first time through another person’s eyes, not through her own. And what she sees is not how she sees herself. It’s something less than perfect. And that f–kin’ broke my heart.

So by the time we get to the scene, we walked in and everybody was really quiet. We sat down to rehearse it with Paris, who Kim and I trust implicitly, and it’s all right there. I turned to Paris and said, “Can you shoot this at the same time?” And Paris said, “Absolutely. That’s exactly what we’re gonna do.” Paris set it up so there was a camera on both of these people as they were going through this emotion‚ and I say “these people” in third person because I don’t believe that I was there or Kim was there—it was them. It was their relationship. And Paris just let the camera roll. He came in and tweaked us as needed, and that was it. We did it maybe three times total. It was so pure and so without ego and so not result-oriented. It was just outside of all of us: Just let these two people heal one another, and then let’s walk away. It was one of the most cathartic experiences of my life as an artist.

Sep 23, 2014

First look at Venus Van Dam’s return to ‘Sons of Anarchy’

Sep 23, 2014

First look at Venus Van Dam’s return to ‘Sons of Anarchy’

EW.com — No matter how dark things get on FX’s Sons of Anarchy, just remember that Venus Van Dam is on the way. The transgender escort played by Justified‘s Walton Goggins makes her return in the Sept. 30 episode when SAMCRO, in need of information, pays her a visit. As fans know, the cast lights up any time her name is mentioned, and Goggins feels that each time he steps on set.

SOA-VENUS-VAN-DAM

“I really do, and it’s weird. Because I personally, Walton Goggins, don’t feel that—I feel it as Venus,” he says. “Venus feels it and recipocates that with her boys—all the guys on the show. She just considers them brothers, like seeing family that she hasn’t seen in a while. They’re so kind and so gentle to Venus. It’s so refreshing. There’s no competition, there’s just enjoyment on all sides.”

Venus, who was introduced in season five and returned in season six, will also appear in the final ride’s 10th episode. As creator Kurt Sutter told EW, “We find out what’s been going down off-screen between Venus and Tig [Kim Coates]. It’ll be our love story for the season.”

Oct 22, 2013

Walton Talks Venus’ Major Comeback with TVLine & TVGuide

Oct 22, 2013

Walton Talks Venus’ Major Comeback with TVLine & TVGuide

Check out what Walton had to say about the more serious side of his Sons of Anarchy alter-ego, Venus Van Dam!

TVLine: Venus’ story was much more serious this time around. Was the energy on set different than it was last season?
Yeah, it was. First and foremost, it was more than just one day; it took place over the course of three weeks because it was two episodes. Sustaining that and living in that headspace was a little more challenging — for myself as much as it was for my wife! [Laughs] She kept saying, ‘Where are my shoes?’ Both Kurt [Sutter] and I weren’t interested in repeating what we’d done last season and it would have done a disservice to Venus. If we were going to do it again, we wanted to see another side of her and to see the tragedy in her life and the pain that she’s been living with — and also how that can impact the larger story that is Sons of Anarchy. So, I was just over the moon with what Kurt and his writers came up with. I’m a new parent, I have a three-year-old son, and regardless of your sexual orientation, the idea of having to hide who you are or not to participate in the things that I’ve been able to participate in as a parent? It’s heartbreaking. It was very personal to me and very personal to Kurt. We both are in love with her. I don’t stop thinking about Venus, and as soon as I took those high heels off, I wanted to put them right back on. She’s a very courageous, very flawed, very strong woman — or let’s shoot right past that and say [that she’s a strong] person in the world.

You share such incredible chemistry with Kim Coates. How did the Venus/Tig relationship come to fruition?
First off, I’m such a fan of Kim Coates. Everything he does is grounded in reality and he’s such a good actor that it was a pleasure to have these discussions before [we shot] and to really talk about, ‘What is this? Really, what is this?’ What I was so surprised about was that there was no sexuality in that moment at all. He was putting his arm around a person and comforting that person when they needed to be comforted. It takes a lot to earn that and I thought what Kim did there was amazing. Now, I don’t know what happens when they go home! That’s another episode. [Laughs] But in that moment it was not about Venus Van Dam as a transgender and Tig as a biker; it was about two human beings that are looking at this very difficult situation and one supporting another. It’s beautiful. [Continue Reading]

TVGuide: This episode required a much different performance than last time. What was that like for you?
Goggins:
I think the most important thing is seeing past just what she does for work. I liked piercing the veil of who this person is outside of what she does for a living. When she goes home at night, what’s that like? What are the regrets in her life? And how has she dealt with those and how have those regrets reverberated throughout her life? What I was so excited about when I got the script was how immediate this situation had come up in her life and she really had nowhere else to turn. And for a woman who, more often than not, has the answers, she only had questions and she didn’t quite know what to do.

And it wasn’t just cold-blooded murder. She was trying to spare her son the same horror she went through.
Goggins:
It’s a matter of breaking the cycle. And sometimes breaking the cycle of violence requires an act of violence. Hopefully on the other side of that, once you cross that rubicon, you walk in greener pastures. I think that’s what it was like for Venus. She’s eternally grateful for Jax for doing something that she could never do. It solves a lot of problems. It solves more problems than it creates.

So. is this the last we’ve seen of Venus?
Goggins:
[Laughs] I wouldn’t be surprised if you saw her again. We’ll see what happens to Jax and all the boys and how these stories intersect. I wouldn’t think it out of the realm of possibility.[Continue Reading]

Apr 3, 2013

Justified Season 4 Finale Post Mortem – Index Post

Apr 3, 2013

Justified Season 4 Finale Post Mortem – Index Post

Check out snippets of what Justified show-runner Graham Yost had to say about the season four finale and what’s to come in season 5! Plenty more under the cut!

They show up to the spot and find police have already found the body. Instead of leaving, Boyd goes up to talk to Officer Mooney (William Gregory Lee), which I thought was a surprising choice.
He’s Boyd. They can’t arrest him for just driving. So he’ll just go up. His relationship with Mooney has been on and off. It seemed like a smart way for him to find out more.

Boyd then decides to use Mooney and Lee Paxton (Sam Anderson), whose funeral home serves as storage for law enforcement, to help him switch bodies so it’s not Delroy’s body that was found.
That came out of the room. What would Boyd try to do? Okay, so, they’ve got Ellen May, she could testify, but if they don’t have a body, then the case might fall apart. So let’s take care of the body and get it out of there. We can’t? Okay, where is it? We’re still not done yet. It’s just that Boyd sense of he’ll always keep working a problem until it’s absolutely impossible to do so. And believe you me, at the beginning of next season, we’re gonna see him continue to work the problem. How can he get Ava out of jail? And what will he do in order to accomplish that?

Boyd and Jimmy digging up the grave for a replacement body was a surprisingly fun scene with Jimmy falling through the coffin.
Those guys in a graveyard at night, in a potter’s field, digging up a corpse, stuff comes up. I don’t know exactly the origin of Boyd’s run about who that is in the ground. The little behind the scenes thing is Jesse Lukens, on one take, when his foot went through, he actually damaged his foot quite badly. At the cast party, he was on crutches. He was in real pain. But we use that on Justified — if a character’s in real pain, we use it.

While that’s happening, Boyd is driving Raylan to the airport for the meeting. That’s another crucial scene that’s all dialogue.
That scene had a lot of talk between the writers, and Tim, and Walton. What can we get out of here? Tim is always interested in being clear that Boyd is a bad guy, but as he basically says, “You’re a white supremacist, you’re leading a church out in the woods. Who are you, and what do you really believe in? So if you say you love this woman [Ava], how is that different from all the other stuff that you’ve said?” Of course, Boyd maintains that it is different. We wanted to play up that dynamic, and then the whole notion of Boyd going at Raylan is something that we’d established pretty nicely in the opening of episode 10 when he says, “Raylan, you are an asshole, you should have been an outlaw.” And that just goes back thematically to Raylan and Arlo: Who is Raylan? How much is he like Arlo? Is he really just Arlo with a badge?

Continue reading over at EW.COM

Continue Reading →

Jul 17, 2012

‘Django Unchained’ Stars Washington, Waltz, and Goggins Dish on the Western

Jul 17, 2012

‘Django Unchained’ Stars Washington, Waltz, and Goggins Dish on the Western

Among all the sci-fi and superhero hoopla of San Diego Comic-Con, it was a western that caused one of the most formidable stirs in Hall H. However, Django Unchained, the latest film from cinephile-turned-master-director Quentin Tarantino, is no ordinary western. Having spoken with the unique film’s star Jamie Foxx, it seemed only sporting to reload questions and see how quick on the draw Christoph Waltz, Kerry Washington, and Walton Goggins could be in the post-panel roundtable interviews.

Walton Goggins: “I got down to New Orleans and started bonding with some of the guys, some of the black actors. We started hanging out, had a lot of friends in common. And then comes your first day of work, and…you have to say these things and do these things. While liberal Walton didn’t have anything to apologize for, I began every take with an apology. These are my friends. It’s not easy — it’s awful to say these things. But you’re in the service of something much greater than yourself. You’re telling a piece of history that is the biggest blight on our history as a country. It needs to be retold, and I’m a part of that.”

The western is one of the oldest genres in cinema, it means different things to different people, and the cast of Django Unchained certainly runs the entire spectrum with their feelings on the subject.

source

Jun 7, 2012

BACKSTAGE Roundtable With Seven Stars Who Had an Emmy-Worthy Year

Jun 7, 2012

BACKSTAGE Roundtable With Seven Stars Who Had an Emmy-Worthy Year

Walton and Martha, you were both first-time Emmy nominees last year. How did you get the news of your nomination?

WALTON GOGGINS: My little boy had woken up and the announcements were coming relatively soon. And I handed him over to my wife and said, “Can you handle this please, so I can just go downstairs and watch?” Tim [Olyphant] was announced first, so I started screaming. And my wife said, “Please be quiet, I’m trying to get him back down!” So when I heard my name was called, I had to be really quiet. I couldn’t even celebrate, to be quite honest. But it was so unexpected.

And William, you’ve been nominated several times and won twice.

WILLIAM H. MACY: I remember the second time, we were lying in bed and the phone rang at a quarter to zero in the morning, and I turned to Felicity [Huffman, Macy’s wife] and I said, “Well, either a family member just died or I got nominated.”

JOEL MCHALE: Or both.

What’s it like to actually hear your name called as the winner?

MACY: I’ll tell you this, and this is God’s honest truth: It’s better to win.

GOGGINS: Did you practice the speech? Did you have an idea what you would say?

People like to use the term “big break,” but when was the moment you first felt you’d really made it as an actor?

GOGGINS: For me it was “The Apostle.” I was 24 years old and getting an opportunity to work with Robert Duvall. It changed my life. He called me with the news, and I saved that message for as long as I possibly could. Duvall was amazing. The first day, we were in Lafayette, Louisiana, and we went out to dinner and I didn’t say anything the entire time. I just looked down at my plate. I didn’t want to get fired or say something stupid like “Hey! I like ‘The Godfather’!”

FILLION: Would you consider him a mentor?

GOGGINS: Absolutely. I was at that age where I was extremely impressionable, and I finally got up the courage after being with him for a month to say, “How do you do it, man?” And he just said, “I don’t do anything. I just play pretend. A child’s game.” Which just fucking floored me.

You can check out the interview in full over at Backstage.com

Jun 6, 2012

Emmys 2012: TV’s Supporting Players Talk Ensemble Work, Geek Out at THR’s Photo Shoot

Jun 6, 2012

Emmys 2012: TV’s Supporting Players Talk Ensemble Work, Geek Out at THR’s Photo Shoot

It’s late May in Hollywood and 25 of TV’s Unsung Heroes have gathered at Siren Orange Studios in Los Angeles for The Hollywood Reporter’s supporting actor/actress photo shoot.

But to see the stars from series including The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones, Justified, Mad Men, Burn Notice, Suburgatory, The Big Bang Theory, Smash and more interact, the mood was more like a fan convention.

Justified’s Walton Goggins made a beeline for Game of Thrones’ Kit Harington, where the two debated who’d fare best on their respective series. “I’d want a really big sword, I’d have one day on the call sheet because I would take some people down! But I’d be killed right away,” Goggins laughed. “I’d walk onto your show with my sword and just get shot point blank!” the man also known as Jon Snow retorted.

source

Gallery Link:
Photo Sessions > Session #010

Jun 1, 2012

The GQ ‘Villains Questionnaire’ Featuring Walton

Jun 1, 2012

The GQ ‘Villains Questionnaire’ Featuring Walton

GQ: What scared you when you were a child?
Walton Goggins: 
If I’m being honest, it was a shark. It was Jaws. You know I didn’t watch a lot of scary movies when I was a kid, but I did see that one and I refused to even get in a bathtub, much less a lake or the ocean. Believe it or not, it inspired me to become a master scuba diver so that I could deal with that fear. So, thanks, Steven Spielberg.

GQ: Has there ever been a villain that you rooted for, that you admired?
Walton Goggins: 
I think villains have had a resurgence in the last ten years, thanks to cable TV dramas, which have allowed for more exploration of men like Tony Soprano or Vic Mackey (Michael Chiklis, The Shield)—anti-heroes who would, before that, have just been somebody the good guy killed. Those two, in particular, were bad guys I couldn’t get enough of. I wanted to understand them. And viewers have that opportunity when they can watch eighty-five hours of a character on TV. In a film, there’s not enough time to really flesh a villain out. With Vic Mackey—Chiklis did him right. You come to see the world from his perverted moral compass.

GQ: How much of Boyd existed on the page, and how much did you bring to the role?
Walton Goggins: 
The words existed, strung together in a very poetic way. I added a level of ambiguity early on, which I think was Boyd’s strength in the first episodes. And I was able to bring an intellect. I was interested in playing a guy who, more often than not, is the smartest person in the room—a person who has a real flare and a love of words, who is self-taught, and a showman. You know, I’m from the South, and I wasn’t interested in perpetuating a stereotypical southern character. I wanted Boyd to be everything under the sun—smart being most important. But the first script I read? It was really good—eighty percent of Boyd was right there. He felt like putting on a comfortable pair of shoes

You can check out the interview in full over at GQ.com

May 21, 2012

Variety to host Emmy thesp panels, Walton to Attend.

May 21, 2012

Variety to host Emmy thesp panels, Walton to Attend.

Variety will conduct a series of Emmy-centric interview panels moderated by its TV editors under the Variety Studio banner.

Actors and actresses in the lead and supporting categories for comedy and drama will gather May 30-31 at the Andaz Hotel in West Hollywood for the interview sessions. Among the three dozen thesps scheduled for the chats include Kaley Cuoco (“The Big Bang Theory”), Laura Dern (“Enlightened”), Walton Goggins (“Justified”), Joel McHale (“Community”), Jessica Pare (“Mad Men”) and Kiefer Sutherland (“Touch”).

The sessions will run online at Variety Emmy Central beginning June 11 and also have a print component.

Variety Studio has previously been a fixture at the Sundance and Toronto film festivals. Other Variety events tied to the Emmy campaign season in the near future include invitation-only “A Night in the Writers’ Room” on June 12 at the Writers Guild of America Theater in Beverly Hills.

source