Jul 17, 2012

‘Django Unchained’ Stars Washington, Waltz, and Goggins Dish on the Western

Jul 17, 2012

‘Django Unchained’ Stars Washington, Waltz, and Goggins Dish on the Western

Among all the sci-fi and superhero hoopla of San Diego Comic-Con, it was a western that caused one of the most formidable stirs in Hall H. However, Django Unchained, the latest film from cinephile-turned-master-director Quentin Tarantino, is no ordinary western. Having spoken with the unique film’s star Jamie Foxx, it seemed only sporting to reload questions and see how quick on the draw Christoph Waltz, Kerry Washington, and Walton Goggins could be in the post-panel roundtable interviews.

Walton Goggins: “I got down to New Orleans and started bonding with some of the guys, some of the black actors. We started hanging out, had a lot of friends in common. And then comes your first day of work, and…you have to say these things and do these things. While liberal Walton didn’t have anything to apologize for, I began every take with an apology. These are my friends. It’s not easy — it’s awful to say these things. But you’re in the service of something much greater than yourself. You’re telling a piece of history that is the biggest blight on our history as a country. It needs to be retold, and I’m a part of that.”

The western is one of the oldest genres in cinema, it means different things to different people, and the cast of Django Unchained certainly runs the entire spectrum with their feelings on the subject.

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Jun 7, 2012

BACKSTAGE Roundtable With Seven Stars Who Had an Emmy-Worthy Year

Jun 7, 2012

BACKSTAGE Roundtable With Seven Stars Who Had an Emmy-Worthy Year

Walton and Martha, you were both first-time Emmy nominees last year. How did you get the news of your nomination?

WALTON GOGGINS: My little boy had woken up and the announcements were coming relatively soon. And I handed him over to my wife and said, “Can you handle this please, so I can just go downstairs and watch?” Tim [Olyphant] was announced first, so I started screaming. And my wife said, “Please be quiet, I’m trying to get him back down!” So when I heard my name was called, I had to be really quiet. I couldn’t even celebrate, to be quite honest. But it was so unexpected.

And William, you’ve been nominated several times and won twice.

WILLIAM H. MACY: I remember the second time, we were lying in bed and the phone rang at a quarter to zero in the morning, and I turned to Felicity [Huffman, Macy’s wife] and I said, “Well, either a family member just died or I got nominated.”

JOEL MCHALE: Or both.

What’s it like to actually hear your name called as the winner?

MACY: I’ll tell you this, and this is God’s honest truth: It’s better to win.

GOGGINS: Did you practice the speech? Did you have an idea what you would say?

People like to use the term “big break,” but when was the moment you first felt you’d really made it as an actor?

GOGGINS: For me it was “The Apostle.” I was 24 years old and getting an opportunity to work with Robert Duvall. It changed my life. He called me with the news, and I saved that message for as long as I possibly could. Duvall was amazing. The first day, we were in Lafayette, Louisiana, and we went out to dinner and I didn’t say anything the entire time. I just looked down at my plate. I didn’t want to get fired or say something stupid like “Hey! I like ‘The Godfather’!”

FILLION: Would you consider him a mentor?

GOGGINS: Absolutely. I was at that age where I was extremely impressionable, and I finally got up the courage after being with him for a month to say, “How do you do it, man?” And he just said, “I don’t do anything. I just play pretend. A child’s game.” Which just fucking floored me.

You can check out the interview in full over at Backstage.com

Jun 6, 2012

Emmys 2012: TV’s Supporting Players Talk Ensemble Work, Geek Out at THR’s Photo Shoot

Jun 6, 2012

Emmys 2012: TV’s Supporting Players Talk Ensemble Work, Geek Out at THR’s Photo Shoot

It’s late May in Hollywood and 25 of TV’s Unsung Heroes have gathered at Siren Orange Studios in Los Angeles for The Hollywood Reporter’s supporting actor/actress photo shoot.

But to see the stars from series including The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones, Justified, Mad Men, Burn Notice, Suburgatory, The Big Bang Theory, Smash and more interact, the mood was more like a fan convention.

Justified’s Walton Goggins made a beeline for Game of Thrones’ Kit Harington, where the two debated who’d fare best on their respective series. “I’d want a really big sword, I’d have one day on the call sheet because I would take some people down! But I’d be killed right away,” Goggins laughed. “I’d walk onto your show with my sword and just get shot point blank!” the man also known as Jon Snow retorted.

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Gallery Link:
Photo Sessions > Session #010

Jun 1, 2012

The GQ ‘Villains Questionnaire’ Featuring Walton

Jun 1, 2012

The GQ ‘Villains Questionnaire’ Featuring Walton

GQ: What scared you when you were a child?
Walton Goggins: 
If I’m being honest, it was a shark. It was Jaws. You know I didn’t watch a lot of scary movies when I was a kid, but I did see that one and I refused to even get in a bathtub, much less a lake or the ocean. Believe it or not, it inspired me to become a master scuba diver so that I could deal with that fear. So, thanks, Steven Spielberg.

GQ: Has there ever been a villain that you rooted for, that you admired?
Walton Goggins: 
I think villains have had a resurgence in the last ten years, thanks to cable TV dramas, which have allowed for more exploration of men like Tony Soprano or Vic Mackey (Michael Chiklis, The Shield)—anti-heroes who would, before that, have just been somebody the good guy killed. Those two, in particular, were bad guys I couldn’t get enough of. I wanted to understand them. And viewers have that opportunity when they can watch eighty-five hours of a character on TV. In a film, there’s not enough time to really flesh a villain out. With Vic Mackey—Chiklis did him right. You come to see the world from his perverted moral compass.

GQ: How much of Boyd existed on the page, and how much did you bring to the role?
Walton Goggins: 
The words existed, strung together in a very poetic way. I added a level of ambiguity early on, which I think was Boyd’s strength in the first episodes. And I was able to bring an intellect. I was interested in playing a guy who, more often than not, is the smartest person in the room—a person who has a real flare and a love of words, who is self-taught, and a showman. You know, I’m from the South, and I wasn’t interested in perpetuating a stereotypical southern character. I wanted Boyd to be everything under the sun—smart being most important. But the first script I read? It was really good—eighty percent of Boyd was right there. He felt like putting on a comfortable pair of shoes

You can check out the interview in full over at GQ.com

May 21, 2012

Variety to host Emmy thesp panels, Walton to Attend.

May 21, 2012

Variety to host Emmy thesp panels, Walton to Attend.

Variety will conduct a series of Emmy-centric interview panels moderated by its TV editors under the Variety Studio banner.

Actors and actresses in the lead and supporting categories for comedy and drama will gather May 30-31 at the Andaz Hotel in West Hollywood for the interview sessions. Among the three dozen thesps scheduled for the chats include Kaley Cuoco (“The Big Bang Theory”), Laura Dern (“Enlightened”), Walton Goggins (“Justified”), Joel McHale (“Community”), Jessica Pare (“Mad Men”) and Kiefer Sutherland (“Touch”).

The sessions will run online at Variety Emmy Central beginning June 11 and also have a print component.

Variety Studio has previously been a fixture at the Sundance and Toronto film festivals. Other Variety events tied to the Emmy campaign season in the near future include invitation-only “A Night in the Writers’ Room” on June 12 at the Writers Guild of America Theater in Beverly Hills.

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May 10, 2012

Walton To Absorb Kurt Russell’s Role In ‘Django Unchained’

May 10, 2012

Walton To Absorb Kurt Russell’s Role In ‘Django Unchained’

According to CinemaBlend.com Walton is set to absorb Kur Russell’s role in Quentin Tarantino’s new film ‘Django Unchained’ which Walton was already apart of. You can read more below!

It was disheartening to hear last night that both Kurt Russell and Sacha Baron Cohen had dropped out of Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, each for their own, slightly unclear reasons. Baron Cohen was busy promoting his new comedy The Dictator, but Russell’s departure was even more mysterious, especially since he’d been cast in the relatively large role of Ace Woody, a vicious employee of Leonardo DiCaprio’s evil slaveowner character Calvin Candie.

Russell had already replaced Kevin Costner in the role, but with Django already shooting and set for December 25 release this year, it was unclear how someone could step in and replace him so quickly. But Ain’t It Cool reports it’s not nearly so complicated or dramatic. In true Tarantino fashion, the script is changing and evolving even as shooting happens, and Russell’s role changed to the point that Walton Goggins, who plays another nasty overseer, will basically absorb the part. It seems clear that Russell did indeed quit, but their sources say he didn’t storm off the set, and his departure had nothing to do with Sacha Baron Cohen leaving as well.

With so many actors in the cast, it seems clear that not everybody would have as much time to shine as they probably deserved– and Tarantino, whose films are always long and overstuffed anyway, seemed pretty likely to have written a script that was too long and busy for so many actors. So while Russell will be missed, fans of Goggins’s work on Justified will probably be thrilled to see more of him– and given the stunning cast Tarantino still has on board, there is still plenty more for the rest of us to enjoy, with or without Snake Plissken.

Apr 12, 2012

Walton Talks Justified Season Finale with MSN TV Buzz

Apr 12, 2012

Walton Talks Justified Season Finale with MSN TV Buzz

We caught up with Goggins recently as he talked about all things Boyd Crowder as the third season comes to an end.

MSN TV: What are your thoughts on this season?
Walton Goggins: I’m really proud of the last five episodes. And when I say I’m proud, I’m not just talking about my participation. I mean I’m proud of everybody. I’m such a fan of all the actors on the show. And we’re so lucky to have Mykelti Williamson join us this year. It’s a season about crossing lines. It’s about people doing things they said they would never do. Boyd is so perplexing to me. He got an opportunity, in some ways, to stand in front of a pulpit and galvanize the people that are behind him to sway the election for sheriff. It was his way of striking back. The thing about Boyd Crowder is that he doesn’t always strike back with a gun. He rarely ever uses his fists unless he needs to. The most powerful weapon in his arsenal is his oratorical skills and his ability to empathize with people. And we’ve seen that on display this season.

Has Boyd evolved as a character?
He has. In the first season, Boyd was comfortable with who he was because he was living a lie. After the first episode, he was almost killed. And I’ve said this before, but because he almost met his maker, he found God. By the end of the first season, his belief in God and everything was shaken. The first half of Season 2 for him was about becoming comfortable with who he is and being honest with himself about who he is. And now in Season 3, it is about him building this criminal empire in a way that is slow and methodical. And he’s hamstrung by his crew. He has Ava (Joelle Carter), which is awesome, and he has Arlo (Raymond J. Barry), who is a lion in winter. And he has his cousin Johnny (David Meunier), who is in a wheelchair. But, it doesn’t matter. Now he has some muscle and he’s slowly building it and, hopefully, for the first time in his life, he’s able to see an endgame.

Would you say Boyd has become a more enlightened criminal?
Human beings are so peculiar. If you drink coffee to wake up in the morning, like I do because I have a 14-month-old son, you can’t drink too much because that’s kind of bad for you. But I’ll still drink too much coffee and I’ll find a way to justify it. For Boyd, that’s the way he approaches building a criminal empire. Initially, I think he was kind of justifying the things that he was doing because he’s a showman, a charlatan. And when he found God, he did the same thing but with different motivations. It’s thinly veiled if you look through it. That’s why at the end of Season 2, he realizes that he’s going to do the things he has to do not because he’s found God or because he’s a narcissist and needs people to follow him. He’s doing it because that’s who he is. In the end, Boyd may get brought down by the very thing that has saved him, and that is love.

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Apr 11, 2012

MTV: Season Finale Leaves Walton ‘Proud’ Of Boyd Crowder

Apr 11, 2012

MTV: Season Finale Leaves Walton ‘Proud’ Of Boyd Crowder

Being bad can cost an arm and a leg. And in the case of Robert Quarles, well … at least he’s still got the leg!

“Justified” concluded its third season on Tuesday night, bringing the 13-episode conflict between U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens, meat-cleaving money-hoarder Ellstin Limehouse and the bleach-blond OxyContin-popping gangster Quarles to a boil. In the midst of Limehouse’s slaughterhouse, Quarles tried to kill Givens with that way-too-cool gun up his sleeve, only to find his gun — and, by extension, most of his arm — on the floor, cleaved off in one smooth move by a butcher-knife-wielding Limehouse. It was a glorious, gory way to close out the Quarles story while still leaving the door open for the immensely watchable Neal McDonough in future seasons, and an equally brilliant way to deliver on the bloody promise of Limehouse’s butchering skills, all while keeping Timothy Olyphant’s Raylan firmly in the mix.

There was only one ingredient missing from the equation: Boyd Crowder, the most complicated criminal in Harlan County. Played to morally ambiguous perfection by “The Shield” veteran Walton Goggins, Boyd nearly left season three of “Justified” in a prison cell — all-too-familiar circumstances for the pyrotechnically inclined antihero — and, in the process, unavailable for the final showdown between Raylan, Quarles and Limehouse. To a degree, Boyd’s exclusion from the scene was disappointing for fans wanting to see the character get some much-craved justice against Quarles and Limehouse, two of his chief rivals throughout season three. But Goggins sees it another way.

“In some ways, Boyd being in that scene, that’s what you expected. That’s kind of the payoff that everybody was looking for,” Goggins told MTV News in a recent interview about how the “Justified” finale played out for Boyd. “In some ways, we don’t want to rob people of those expectations, but I believe [‘Justified’ executive producer Graham Yost] is always looking for different kinds of angles. Boyd was really robbed of his revenge on both [Dickey Bennett, played by ‘Lost’ alum Jeremy Davies] and on Quarles in a way. I think that’s really going to serve the story going forward.”

You can check out the interview in full over at MTV.com

Apr 10, 2012

Walton talk’s Justified Season Finale, Boyd’s Fate, and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained

Apr 10, 2012

Walton talk’s Justified Season Finale, Boyd’s Fate, and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained

GQ: The transitions that your character’s made over the years have been really interesting. Boyd isn’t a conflicted figure as much anymore; it’s more that he’s become this criminal mastermind who still feels that he’s a principled figure.
Walton Goggins:
Yeah, I would absolutely agree with that. Last season was about a man coming to grips with who he was, and that chrysalis can be very painful. But once you’ve crossed that rubicon and you’re OK with who you are, than it’s all about moving forward. For the first time, I think, in Boyd’s life, he’s walking in a straight line and is taking his time. He’s not running; he’s walking. This season is about laying the foundation for what it is that he wants to accomplish and manifesting the person who he is, marrying the poet and the criminal [laughs].

GQ: Boyd seems to be savoring his words more than he’s done before.
Walton Goggins:
You think? I don’t know! I think he’s always been a lover of words, and that’s one of the things that I’ve wanted to infuse Boyd with from the pilot — that he’s a person who’s self-taught.

GQ: One of my favorite scenes from the season is when Boyd and Quarles came face-to-face for the first time.
Walton Goggins:
It was so delicious. Neal McDonough! Give me Neal McDonough and a glass of wine, and I’ll sit and talk for five hours. He’s such an extraordinary talent, and so focused. He doesn’t waste a movement, very similar to Boyd in that way. We hoped that it would be special. It was written. It was on the page. We kept looking at the words during the construction of the scene, to really flesh it out and have it be an intellectual repartee, and to leave the scene with great respect for one another. I think we were able to accomplish that. There was one line that I threw in at the last minute, as Quarles is walking out the door. I looked to the people in my crew, and I said, “That’s one rare, smart man.” And it’s true! You don’t have to like somebody, but you can still respect him. Harlan County’s big enough to allow its characters to do that.

You can check out the interview in full over at GQ.com

Apr 10, 2012

Timothy, Walton & Joelle Tease a ‘Different, Violent and Sad’ Season Finale

Apr 10, 2012

Timothy, Walton & Joelle Tease a ‘Different, Violent and Sad’ Season Finale

Now heading into Season 3’s final hour, we’ve got Neal McDonough’s Robert Quarles vanished and on the lam after surviving the bombing of his car, leaving Raylan hot to hunt down the Detroit mob flunkie as well as determine who gunned down state trooper Tom.

And that’s not to mention Boyd’s own agenda in the wake of almost losing his own life, and whatever strategic, self-serving move Mykelti Williamson’s Limehouse now has in mind.

All told, when asked for three words to sum up this week’s finale, Goggins after some thought offered, “Different. Violent. And sad.”

You can check out the article in full over at TVLine.com