May 10, 2012

Walton To Absorb Kurt Russell’s Role In ‘Django Unchained’

May 10, 2012

Walton To Absorb Kurt Russell’s Role In ‘Django Unchained’

According to CinemaBlend.com Walton is set to absorb Kur Russell’s role in Quentin Tarantino’s new film ‘Django Unchained’ which Walton was already apart of. You can read more below!

It was disheartening to hear last night that both Kurt Russell and Sacha Baron Cohen had dropped out of Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, each for their own, slightly unclear reasons. Baron Cohen was busy promoting his new comedy The Dictator, but Russell’s departure was even more mysterious, especially since he’d been cast in the relatively large role of Ace Woody, a vicious employee of Leonardo DiCaprio’s evil slaveowner character Calvin Candie.

Russell had already replaced Kevin Costner in the role, but with Django already shooting and set for December 25 release this year, it was unclear how someone could step in and replace him so quickly. But Ain’t It Cool reports it’s not nearly so complicated or dramatic. In true Tarantino fashion, the script is changing and evolving even as shooting happens, and Russell’s role changed to the point that Walton Goggins, who plays another nasty overseer, will basically absorb the part. It seems clear that Russell did indeed quit, but their sources say he didn’t storm off the set, and his departure had nothing to do with Sacha Baron Cohen leaving as well.

With so many actors in the cast, it seems clear that not everybody would have as much time to shine as they probably deserved– and Tarantino, whose films are always long and overstuffed anyway, seemed pretty likely to have written a script that was too long and busy for so many actors. So while Russell will be missed, fans of Goggins’s work on Justified will probably be thrilled to see more of him– and given the stunning cast Tarantino still has on board, there is still plenty more for the rest of us to enjoy, with or without Snake Plissken.

Apr 12, 2012

Walton Talks Justified Season Finale with MSN TV Buzz

Apr 12, 2012

Walton Talks Justified Season Finale with MSN TV Buzz

We caught up with Goggins recently as he talked about all things Boyd Crowder as the third season comes to an end.

MSN TV: What are your thoughts on this season?
Walton Goggins: I’m really proud of the last five episodes. And when I say I’m proud, I’m not just talking about my participation. I mean I’m proud of everybody. I’m such a fan of all the actors on the show. And we’re so lucky to have Mykelti Williamson join us this year. It’s a season about crossing lines. It’s about people doing things they said they would never do. Boyd is so perplexing to me. He got an opportunity, in some ways, to stand in front of a pulpit and galvanize the people that are behind him to sway the election for sheriff. It was his way of striking back. The thing about Boyd Crowder is that he doesn’t always strike back with a gun. He rarely ever uses his fists unless he needs to. The most powerful weapon in his arsenal is his oratorical skills and his ability to empathize with people. And we’ve seen that on display this season.

Has Boyd evolved as a character?
He has. In the first season, Boyd was comfortable with who he was because he was living a lie. After the first episode, he was almost killed. And I’ve said this before, but because he almost met his maker, he found God. By the end of the first season, his belief in God and everything was shaken. The first half of Season 2 for him was about becoming comfortable with who he is and being honest with himself about who he is. And now in Season 3, it is about him building this criminal empire in a way that is slow and methodical. And he’s hamstrung by his crew. He has Ava (Joelle Carter), which is awesome, and he has Arlo (Raymond J. Barry), who is a lion in winter. And he has his cousin Johnny (David Meunier), who is in a wheelchair. But, it doesn’t matter. Now he has some muscle and he’s slowly building it and, hopefully, for the first time in his life, he’s able to see an endgame.

Would you say Boyd has become a more enlightened criminal?
Human beings are so peculiar. If you drink coffee to wake up in the morning, like I do because I have a 14-month-old son, you can’t drink too much because that’s kind of bad for you. But I’ll still drink too much coffee and I’ll find a way to justify it. For Boyd, that’s the way he approaches building a criminal empire. Initially, I think he was kind of justifying the things that he was doing because he’s a showman, a charlatan. And when he found God, he did the same thing but with different motivations. It’s thinly veiled if you look through it. That’s why at the end of Season 2, he realizes that he’s going to do the things he has to do not because he’s found God or because he’s a narcissist and needs people to follow him. He’s doing it because that’s who he is. In the end, Boyd may get brought down by the very thing that has saved him, and that is love.

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Apr 11, 2012

MTV: Season Finale Leaves Walton ‘Proud’ Of Boyd Crowder

Apr 11, 2012

MTV: Season Finale Leaves Walton ‘Proud’ Of Boyd Crowder

Being bad can cost an arm and a leg. And in the case of Robert Quarles, well … at least he’s still got the leg!

“Justified” concluded its third season on Tuesday night, bringing the 13-episode conflict between U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens, meat-cleaving money-hoarder Ellstin Limehouse and the bleach-blond OxyContin-popping gangster Quarles to a boil. In the midst of Limehouse’s slaughterhouse, Quarles tried to kill Givens with that way-too-cool gun up his sleeve, only to find his gun — and, by extension, most of his arm — on the floor, cleaved off in one smooth move by a butcher-knife-wielding Limehouse. It was a glorious, gory way to close out the Quarles story while still leaving the door open for the immensely watchable Neal McDonough in future seasons, and an equally brilliant way to deliver on the bloody promise of Limehouse’s butchering skills, all while keeping Timothy Olyphant’s Raylan firmly in the mix.

There was only one ingredient missing from the equation: Boyd Crowder, the most complicated criminal in Harlan County. Played to morally ambiguous perfection by “The Shield” veteran Walton Goggins, Boyd nearly left season three of “Justified” in a prison cell — all-too-familiar circumstances for the pyrotechnically inclined antihero — and, in the process, unavailable for the final showdown between Raylan, Quarles and Limehouse. To a degree, Boyd’s exclusion from the scene was disappointing for fans wanting to see the character get some much-craved justice against Quarles and Limehouse, two of his chief rivals throughout season three. But Goggins sees it another way.

“In some ways, Boyd being in that scene, that’s what you expected. That’s kind of the payoff that everybody was looking for,” Goggins told MTV News in a recent interview about how the “Justified” finale played out for Boyd. “In some ways, we don’t want to rob people of those expectations, but I believe [‘Justified’ executive producer Graham Yost] is always looking for different kinds of angles. Boyd was really robbed of his revenge on both [Dickey Bennett, played by ‘Lost’ alum Jeremy Davies] and on Quarles in a way. I think that’s really going to serve the story going forward.”

You can check out the interview in full over at MTV.com

Apr 10, 2012

Walton talk’s Justified Season Finale, Boyd’s Fate, and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained

Apr 10, 2012

Walton talk’s Justified Season Finale, Boyd’s Fate, and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained

GQ: The transitions that your character’s made over the years have been really interesting. Boyd isn’t a conflicted figure as much anymore; it’s more that he’s become this criminal mastermind who still feels that he’s a principled figure.
Walton Goggins:
Yeah, I would absolutely agree with that. Last season was about a man coming to grips with who he was, and that chrysalis can be very painful. But once you’ve crossed that rubicon and you’re OK with who you are, than it’s all about moving forward. For the first time, I think, in Boyd’s life, he’s walking in a straight line and is taking his time. He’s not running; he’s walking. This season is about laying the foundation for what it is that he wants to accomplish and manifesting the person who he is, marrying the poet and the criminal [laughs].

GQ: Boyd seems to be savoring his words more than he’s done before.
Walton Goggins:
You think? I don’t know! I think he’s always been a lover of words, and that’s one of the things that I’ve wanted to infuse Boyd with from the pilot — that he’s a person who’s self-taught.

GQ: One of my favorite scenes from the season is when Boyd and Quarles came face-to-face for the first time.
Walton Goggins:
It was so delicious. Neal McDonough! Give me Neal McDonough and a glass of wine, and I’ll sit and talk for five hours. He’s such an extraordinary talent, and so focused. He doesn’t waste a movement, very similar to Boyd in that way. We hoped that it would be special. It was written. It was on the page. We kept looking at the words during the construction of the scene, to really flesh it out and have it be an intellectual repartee, and to leave the scene with great respect for one another. I think we were able to accomplish that. There was one line that I threw in at the last minute, as Quarles is walking out the door. I looked to the people in my crew, and I said, “That’s one rare, smart man.” And it’s true! You don’t have to like somebody, but you can still respect him. Harlan County’s big enough to allow its characters to do that.

You can check out the interview in full over at GQ.com

Apr 10, 2012

Timothy, Walton & Joelle Tease a ‘Different, Violent and Sad’ Season Finale

Apr 10, 2012

Timothy, Walton & Joelle Tease a ‘Different, Violent and Sad’ Season Finale

Now heading into Season 3’s final hour, we’ve got Neal McDonough’s Robert Quarles vanished and on the lam after surviving the bombing of his car, leaving Raylan hot to hunt down the Detroit mob flunkie as well as determine who gunned down state trooper Tom.

And that’s not to mention Boyd’s own agenda in the wake of almost losing his own life, and whatever strategic, self-serving move Mykelti Williamson’s Limehouse now has in mind.

All told, when asked for three words to sum up this week’s finale, Goggins after some thought offered, “Different. Violent. And sad.”

You can check out the article in full over at TVLine.com

Mar 6, 2012

FX Renews Justified for a Fourth Season!

Mar 6, 2012

FX Renews Justified for a Fourth Season!

I’m so ecstatic right now! Congratulations to the cast and crew. 🙂

LOS ANGELES, March 6, 2011 – FX has ordered 13 episodes for season four of its Emmy® Award-winning hit drama series Justified, announced Nick Grad, FX Executive Vice President of Original Programming. Six all new episodes remain in season three, airing Tuesdays at 10 PM ET/PT, with the third season finale airing April 10.

“Justified is one of television’s best series and this season has reinforced that excellence,” said Grad. “Graham Yost and his writing team continue to deliver compelling material and richly drawn characters brought to life by the brilliance of Timothy Olyphant and our terrific ensemble cast. Their work is validated by universal acclaim, awards, and ratings that have grown every year. We look forward to many more seasons to come.”

You can read the entire press release over at Deadline.com

Feb 15, 2012

Joelle Carter on What It’s Like Working with Walton

Feb 15, 2012

Joelle Carter on What It’s Like Working with Walton

See what the lovely Joelle Carter had to say about Walton in her recent interview with Collider below.

How has it been to work with both Timothy Olyphant and Walton Goggins? What sort of dynamic do they each bring?
CARTER: I never know what either one of them are going to bring, and they’re both dynamically different. When Walton comes in, you know he’s thought it through, and he’s going to give it to you and change it with every take. Tim wants to throw things in there and throw things out you. He’ll give you lines and say, “I think this actually might be funny if you say it, instead of if I say it.” Tim’s a little more jokester-y. He’s all over the place. Walton is very about the craft of the business. It’s a different dynamic to act with, but both very challenging and satisfying.

Be sure to check out her entire interview over at Collider.com as she discusses Ava’s journey through the seasons and her relationship with both Boyd and Raylan.

Feb 2, 2012

Walton Talks Justified and More with A.V. Club

Feb 2, 2012

Walton Talks Justified and More with A.V. Club

The A.V. Club: You were originally supposed to die at the end of the Justified pilot. Was coming back to life complicated, in terms of other stuff you had going on?

Walton Goggins: I was doing a movie, Predators, and we had already left Hawaii when the show started, so I was able to fly back and forth and just be in town long enough to do a scene here or there. So that’s why, in season one, Boyd was just in every two episodes or one episode, and just kind of had a scene. So I was able to pop in and out.

At the time, I was actually under a contract to star in a show that my partner and I sold to AMC called Rectify, and that prevented me from signing on as a regular early on. Then we got the word, maybe episode nine of Justified, that Rectify wasn’t going to go full with AMC. [Justified] laid out the invitation to me, and I gratefully accepted it, because I was having so much fun. And as it turns out, my partner is doing Rectify for Sundance.

AVC: What was that experience like, to be so liked for season one, but also to be limited in how much you could be in it?

WG: It was so unexpected. I had no expectations for this experience, beyond the love of the word and the people I was working with. I didn’t think about it, because I didn’t have skin in the game. I didn’t have a stake in its longevity early on. The only thing I thought about, really, was getting to work with Tim [Olyphant, as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens] every day and loving it, and [writer-producer] Graham [Yost]. These scripts would come down, and we’d have conversations about them. To have access to work is one thing for an actor; to have access to good work is another thing, and this was good work. I came back in earnest around episode nine, and that’s when Boyd really took off—nine, 10, 11, 12, 13—those last four or five episodes was really when I was available, I was here. And Raylan and Boyd could begin their dance in earnest.

AVC: Especially in season two and three, you’re kind of in your own shadow-show within the show, where you’re doing your own thing and have your own plot. Can that be a little isolating, to be outside of the main storylines?

WG: Well, I think it is. I think those storylines run tandem. I think the same thing with The Shield, with all the different characters, from CC [CCH Pounder] to myself to… Every one of us would have our own story. And yet the strike team would have the procedural, or CC and Jay [Karnes] would have the procedural.

In this show, you have a crime on some level; it’s kind of solved every week. It’s not as clear-cut as The Shield, but that’s not why people watch this show. People watch this show to see the development of the characters. In my world, I feel like I’m participating in the ongoing story, and that’s something people really want to see. It’s not when Raylan is taking down a bad guy that people are interested in Raylan. It’s when he’s dealing with his ex-wife, or when he’s dealing with Boyd or Mags Bennett or Neal McDonough, because you know he’s going to get to deal with them again next week.

So I don’t know. In some ways, I quite liked being the satellite storyline, because I think that it’s in some ways purer. It’s not diluted with the need to have a beginning, a middle, and an end. But it is ongoing in the beginning, middle, and end. It can last over 13 episodes. In some ways, I feel like we’re not even in the middle yet, and we’ve been going on now for 39 episodes, so far.

You can check out the interview in full over at AVClub.com

Jan 15, 2012

Walton Goggins sticks to ABCs in playing mercurial bad guy on ‘Justified’

Jan 15, 2012

Walton Goggins sticks to ABCs in playing mercurial bad guy on ‘Justified’

Is it true the original plan was for Raylan to kill Boyd in the pilot episode of the series?

“That was the foregone conclusion going in. Boyd dies at the end of the short story, Fire in the Hole, by Elmore Leonard, which was the source material for the series. So that was to be the beginning, the middle and the end of Boyd, that one episode. It was a one-off. But there was something there. Casting is such an ephemeral thing. But for me, with Tim, I knew the first time we read through it and the very first time we started shooting that we had a chemistry that was pretty extraordinary. So instead of killing Boyd, we put our heads together and we decided, ‘Let’s see where this goes.’ So Boyd lives.”

Boyd is so unpredictable. He started out as a white supremacist criminal, then reinvented himself as a born-again evangelist; he tried to go straight, then rejoiced when he broke bad again. He has a code, but the rules to his code shift with the wind. Have you figured him out yet?

“I would say he’s a man who likes to live in extremes. And the changes of those extremes bring about a new set of moral principles. He’s only comfortable on the fringes. He’s a showman, and it’s very rare that you get a straight sentence out of him. When you do, hopefully it’s impactful. But I really don’t know how Boyd is going to react in any situation, even with the words on the page. It really only materializes once we’re at work and actually shooting the scene.”

Well, if you don’t know how a scene will play out until you do it, imagine how interested the writers must be, waiting to see what this wild man will do next?

“They really never know either till we shoot it. But I try not to characterize Boyd as a wild man.”

No, you’re the wild man.

“Me? Like, Walton Goggins, me? I’m the wild man? I don’t know. Maybe. I think it’s more about, ‘This is the story, and we’ve got to get from A to B. But who knows the mode of transportation? Are we going to walk to get there or are we going to take an airplane?’ I remember one episode from Season 2. Boyd is dealing with people who want to rob the mine, and they want to kill him. When he gets this information, he’s cool about it, like nothing happened. And I kept playing around with the line, improvising different things, and then I got it: ‘You want to make a living in this business, you’ve got to know your ABCs: Always Be Cool.’ That was the motto of my graduating class, Lithia Springs High School, Class of ’89. The point is, you never know where the right thing to do or say will come from till you get there.”

Is it liberating to be able to channel all of your dark impulses into your performance?

“It’s better than having a therapist. It’s so nice to come home every night with a grin on my face.”

source

Dec 2, 2011

Walton Teases The New Season of ‘Justified’

Dec 2, 2011

Walton Teases The New Season of ‘Justified’

Fans of “Justified” have a solid date to return to Harlan County: Jan. 17.

FX announced its mid-season schedule Monday, opening with the Season 3 premiere of the neo-Western “Justified” on Jan. 17. The animated spy comedy “Archer” will begin its third season two days later on Jan. 19, and will be paired with a new animated comedy called “Unsupervised.”

“Justified” ended its second season with Boyd Crowder (Walton Goggins) going back to his illegal ways by making a play for the Bennett clan’s criminal enterprises, and thus putting him in conflict with his old buddy, U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant). But you just can’t ever tell with these guys; one minute they’re fighting, the next they’re doing shots together.
That’s exactly the mixed signals we get from the Season 3 teasers in the video player above, and from this little tease from Goggins.

“This is a season about crossing personal lines [for] all of us,” the Emmy-nominated actor told me in an email. “For Boyd it’s about rebuilding his house from the ground up, brick by brick, no matter who gets in his way.”
According to FX, Boyd and his crew butt up against an underworld kingpin from Detroit played by Neal McDonagh. Raylan has his own troubles, battling dirty politicians and a man called Limehouse (Mykleti Williamson). And you just know their agendas will bring have them facing off with each other. Carla Gugino also guest stars as a woman from Raylan’s past. “Justified” airs Tuesdays beginning Jan. 17.

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