Mar 6, 2012

FX Renews Justified for a Fourth Season!

Mar 6, 2012

FX Renews Justified for a Fourth Season!

I’m so ecstatic right now! Congratulations to the cast and crew. 🙂

LOS ANGELES, March 6, 2011 – FX has ordered 13 episodes for season four of its Emmy® Award-winning hit drama series Justified, announced Nick Grad, FX Executive Vice President of Original Programming. Six all new episodes remain in season three, airing Tuesdays at 10 PM ET/PT, with the third season finale airing April 10.

“Justified is one of television’s best series and this season has reinforced that excellence,” said Grad. “Graham Yost and his writing team continue to deliver compelling material and richly drawn characters brought to life by the brilliance of Timothy Olyphant and our terrific ensemble cast. Their work is validated by universal acclaim, awards, and ratings that have grown every year. We look forward to many more seasons to come.”

You can read the entire press release over at Deadline.com

Feb 15, 2012

Joelle Carter on What It’s Like Working with Walton

Feb 15, 2012

Joelle Carter on What It’s Like Working with Walton

See what the lovely Joelle Carter had to say about Walton in her recent interview with Collider below.

How has it been to work with both Timothy Olyphant and Walton Goggins? What sort of dynamic do they each bring?
CARTER: I never know what either one of them are going to bring, and they’re both dynamically different. When Walton comes in, you know he’s thought it through, and he’s going to give it to you and change it with every take. Tim wants to throw things in there and throw things out you. He’ll give you lines and say, “I think this actually might be funny if you say it, instead of if I say it.” Tim’s a little more jokester-y. He’s all over the place. Walton is very about the craft of the business. It’s a different dynamic to act with, but both very challenging and satisfying.

Be sure to check out her entire interview over at Collider.com as she discusses Ava’s journey through the seasons and her relationship with both Boyd and Raylan.

Feb 2, 2012

Walton Talks Justified and More with A.V. Club

Feb 2, 2012

Walton Talks Justified and More with A.V. Club

The A.V. Club: You were originally supposed to die at the end of the Justified pilot. Was coming back to life complicated, in terms of other stuff you had going on?

Walton Goggins: I was doing a movie, Predators, and we had already left Hawaii when the show started, so I was able to fly back and forth and just be in town long enough to do a scene here or there. So that’s why, in season one, Boyd was just in every two episodes or one episode, and just kind of had a scene. So I was able to pop in and out.

At the time, I was actually under a contract to star in a show that my partner and I sold to AMC called Rectify, and that prevented me from signing on as a regular early on. Then we got the word, maybe episode nine of Justified, that Rectify wasn’t going to go full with AMC. [Justified] laid out the invitation to me, and I gratefully accepted it, because I was having so much fun. And as it turns out, my partner is doing Rectify for Sundance.

AVC: What was that experience like, to be so liked for season one, but also to be limited in how much you could be in it?

WG: It was so unexpected. I had no expectations for this experience, beyond the love of the word and the people I was working with. I didn’t think about it, because I didn’t have skin in the game. I didn’t have a stake in its longevity early on. The only thing I thought about, really, was getting to work with Tim [Olyphant, as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens] every day and loving it, and [writer-producer] Graham [Yost]. These scripts would come down, and we’d have conversations about them. To have access to work is one thing for an actor; to have access to good work is another thing, and this was good work. I came back in earnest around episode nine, and that’s when Boyd really took off—nine, 10, 11, 12, 13—those last four or five episodes was really when I was available, I was here. And Raylan and Boyd could begin their dance in earnest.

AVC: Especially in season two and three, you’re kind of in your own shadow-show within the show, where you’re doing your own thing and have your own plot. Can that be a little isolating, to be outside of the main storylines?

WG: Well, I think it is. I think those storylines run tandem. I think the same thing with The Shield, with all the different characters, from CC [CCH Pounder] to myself to… Every one of us would have our own story. And yet the strike team would have the procedural, or CC and Jay [Karnes] would have the procedural.

In this show, you have a crime on some level; it’s kind of solved every week. It’s not as clear-cut as The Shield, but that’s not why people watch this show. People watch this show to see the development of the characters. In my world, I feel like I’m participating in the ongoing story, and that’s something people really want to see. It’s not when Raylan is taking down a bad guy that people are interested in Raylan. It’s when he’s dealing with his ex-wife, or when he’s dealing with Boyd or Mags Bennett or Neal McDonough, because you know he’s going to get to deal with them again next week.

So I don’t know. In some ways, I quite liked being the satellite storyline, because I think that it’s in some ways purer. It’s not diluted with the need to have a beginning, a middle, and an end. But it is ongoing in the beginning, middle, and end. It can last over 13 episodes. In some ways, I feel like we’re not even in the middle yet, and we’ve been going on now for 39 episodes, so far.

You can check out the interview in full over at AVClub.com

Jan 15, 2012

Walton Goggins sticks to ABCs in playing mercurial bad guy on ‘Justified’

Jan 15, 2012

Walton Goggins sticks to ABCs in playing mercurial bad guy on ‘Justified’

Is it true the original plan was for Raylan to kill Boyd in the pilot episode of the series?

“That was the foregone conclusion going in. Boyd dies at the end of the short story, Fire in the Hole, by Elmore Leonard, which was the source material for the series. So that was to be the beginning, the middle and the end of Boyd, that one episode. It was a one-off. But there was something there. Casting is such an ephemeral thing. But for me, with Tim, I knew the first time we read through it and the very first time we started shooting that we had a chemistry that was pretty extraordinary. So instead of killing Boyd, we put our heads together and we decided, ‘Let’s see where this goes.’ So Boyd lives.”

Boyd is so unpredictable. He started out as a white supremacist criminal, then reinvented himself as a born-again evangelist; he tried to go straight, then rejoiced when he broke bad again. He has a code, but the rules to his code shift with the wind. Have you figured him out yet?

“I would say he’s a man who likes to live in extremes. And the changes of those extremes bring about a new set of moral principles. He’s only comfortable on the fringes. He’s a showman, and it’s very rare that you get a straight sentence out of him. When you do, hopefully it’s impactful. But I really don’t know how Boyd is going to react in any situation, even with the words on the page. It really only materializes once we’re at work and actually shooting the scene.”

Well, if you don’t know how a scene will play out until you do it, imagine how interested the writers must be, waiting to see what this wild man will do next?

“They really never know either till we shoot it. But I try not to characterize Boyd as a wild man.”

No, you’re the wild man.

“Me? Like, Walton Goggins, me? I’m the wild man? I don’t know. Maybe. I think it’s more about, ‘This is the story, and we’ve got to get from A to B. But who knows the mode of transportation? Are we going to walk to get there or are we going to take an airplane?’ I remember one episode from Season 2. Boyd is dealing with people who want to rob the mine, and they want to kill him. When he gets this information, he’s cool about it, like nothing happened. And I kept playing around with the line, improvising different things, and then I got it: ‘You want to make a living in this business, you’ve got to know your ABCs: Always Be Cool.’ That was the motto of my graduating class, Lithia Springs High School, Class of ’89. The point is, you never know where the right thing to do or say will come from till you get there.”

Is it liberating to be able to channel all of your dark impulses into your performance?

“It’s better than having a therapist. It’s so nice to come home every night with a grin on my face.”

source

Dec 2, 2011

Walton Teases The New Season of ‘Justified’

Dec 2, 2011

Walton Teases The New Season of ‘Justified’

Fans of “Justified” have a solid date to return to Harlan County: Jan. 17.

FX announced its mid-season schedule Monday, opening with the Season 3 premiere of the neo-Western “Justified” on Jan. 17. The animated spy comedy “Archer” will begin its third season two days later on Jan. 19, and will be paired with a new animated comedy called “Unsupervised.”

“Justified” ended its second season with Boyd Crowder (Walton Goggins) going back to his illegal ways by making a play for the Bennett clan’s criminal enterprises, and thus putting him in conflict with his old buddy, U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant). But you just can’t ever tell with these guys; one minute they’re fighting, the next they’re doing shots together.
That’s exactly the mixed signals we get from the Season 3 teasers in the video player above, and from this little tease from Goggins.

“This is a season about crossing personal lines [for] all of us,” the Emmy-nominated actor told me in an email. “For Boyd it’s about rebuilding his house from the ground up, brick by brick, no matter who gets in his way.”
According to FX, Boyd and his crew butt up against an underworld kingpin from Detroit played by Neal McDonagh. Raylan has his own troubles, battling dirty politicians and a man called Limehouse (Mykleti Williamson). And you just know their agendas will bring have them facing off with each other. Carla Gugino also guest stars as a woman from Raylan’s past. “Justified” airs Tuesdays beginning Jan. 17.

source

Sep 13, 2011

Walton Talks ‘Justified’ & Married Life in Hollywood

Sep 13, 2011

Walton Talks ‘Justified’ & Married Life in Hollywood

Walton Goggins is adjusting to walking down red carpets and aisles. The actor and Oscar-winning producer (Best Short Film, The Accountant) recently received a Prime Time Emmy nomination for his turn as Boyd Crowder, a deep-fried and outspoken white supremacist on FX’s Justified and has recently joined the cast for the sequel G.I. Joe 2: Retaliation as Warden Nigel James.

Goggins also costarred in the summer popcorn flick Cowboys & Aliens. Soon to turn 40, the Lithia Springs, Georgia native just last month exchanged wedding vows with his longtime girlfriend filmmaker Nadia Conners (The 11th Hour) with their seven-month-old son Augustus serving as best man.

Many critics and fans of The Shield, on which Goggins portrayed the smarmy Shane Vendrell, point out that the recent nod is long overdue as Hollywood suits take notice. Steven Spielberg cast him as Ohio Congressman (D) Wells A. Hutchins in the undoubtedly epic Lincoln with a 2012 production date. Goggins told UTR that he’s pleased to finally play someone who is articulate and wears a suit, that his career almost didn’t happen and that he doesn’t foresee a full night’s sleep on the horizon. And he’s grateful for every single emotion and speed bump life brings his way.

Q: Are you tired of playing rednecks and a lot of corruptible fellows?

A: I quite like playing people that appear to be one way at first glance and surprise you by infiltrating your sensitive side and you wind up kind of feeling for them in a way that you never anticipated. It’s an interesting dynamic with an interesting trajectory to be a part of. By playing Boyd Crowder and really exploring how smart he is, those things have started to open up to me and I’m grateful for that.

Q: Did David Legrant (the late acting coach) almost derail your career?

A: Ha! At 19, this Georgia boy moved to Los Angeles with only $300 in his pocket, but with an immeasurable amount of tenacity and good luck. Legrant pulled me aside and said, ‘Walton, you’d better become good because you’re not good-looking and for someone like you to make a living in this business, the only thing you’re going to have a fall back on is your talent.’ So, what he asked of me was to be the hardest worker in our class, and he was right. Continue Reading →

Aug 29, 2011

Walton to Present at the 2011 Primetime Emmy Awards

Aug 29, 2011

Walton to Present at the 2011 Primetime Emmy Awards

Paul Reubens, Chris Colfer and Rebecca Romijn are among the latest presenters named for the 2011 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the Television Academy announced on Monday.

Typically, the show pairs actors with a writer or showrunner. Colfer will appear with “Glee” writer Brad Falchuk and Romijn with Paul Scheer from “NTSF:SD:SUV.”

Other new pairings include Walton Goggins and Graham Yost (“Justified”), Priscilla Presley and Steve Binder (“Elvis’ ’68 Comeback Special”) and H. Jon Benjamin and Adam Reed (“Archer”).

Reubens, the writer and star of “The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway,” was not paired with anyone in the announcement.

The Creative Arts Primetime Emmy Awards will take place on Saturday, September 10 at the Nokia Theatre in downtown Los Angeles.

Previously announced presenters include Jon Cryer and Chuck Lorre (“Two and a Half Men”), Alison Brie and Dan Harmon (“Community”), and Jeff Probst and Mark Burnett (“Survivor”).

source

Jul 14, 2011

NYTimes: No Best Drama Nod but No Complaints

Jul 14, 2011

NYTimes: No Best Drama Nod but No Complaints

“Justified,” the Kentucky crime drama on FX, is appearing on various Emmy snub lists, but don’t expect to hear any complaining from Walton Goggins, the excitable actor who plays a cagey ex-con on the series.

“We’re over the moon, man!” he said, more profanely than can be presented here, in an enthusiastic telephone interview on Thursday.

Mr. Goggins’s euphoria was fueled by his first Emmy nomination, for best supporting actor in a drama, as well as by nods for co-stars like Timothy Olyphant, who was nominated in the lead acting category. “When they announced Tim’s name on the telecast, I started screaming so loudly I woke up my son,” Mr. Goggins said.

Margo Martindale, who played a charismatic criminal matriarch in the second season, received a supporting actress nod. Jeremy Davies was nominated as a guest star. Continue Reading →

Jul 14, 2011

Walton Talks to Entertainment Weekly About Emmy Nod

Jul 14, 2011

Walton Talks to Entertainment Weekly About Emmy Nod

For fans of The Shield, today’s nomination for Walton Goggins probably felt ridiculously past due. The actor never got the attention he deserved for co-starring as Det. Shane Vendrell in the FX cop drama The Shield, but he was no less thrilled about today’s nod from the TV Academy for his portrayal of Boyd Crowder in the cabler’s Justified. The drama earned four nominations in all, including one for star Timothy Olyphant.

Ironically, Goggins admits that he was “deep in sh–” when he learned of his nomination. Yep, he was changing his child’s diaper when he got the call. Goggins gave us the tick-tock: ”I woke up at 5:15, got a cup of coffee, sat down at 5:30, watched the broadcast, yelled when they said Tim’s name, started screaming, my son wakes up, he’s screaming for completely different reasons, fiancée wakes up, we’re dealing with the baby, changing the diaper, and I get the call. I was deep in sh–!

“I woke up out of respect for the Academy and the actors and the sheer possibility,” Goggins continued. “I got so excited when Tim was nominated, I kind of forgot that it was even a possibility for me. It was like watching my buddy Michael Chiklis getting nominated way back for The Shield. So I was thinking about calling Tim so I kind of forgot. The work being done in TV right now, and really, during the past 10 years, has been so good. I’m grateful to have been given the opportunity from actor’s standpoint with these two shows. And now to be invited to the party in this way? I hope they don’t rescind the invitation.”

source

Jul 5, 2011

Q+LA: Walton Talks with Los Angeles Times Magazine

Jul 5, 2011

Q+LA: Walton Talks with Los Angeles Times Magazine

Goggins, it seems, is one of those actors whose face grabs the camera and won’t let go. His deep-set eyes, lean build and finger-in-the-socket haircut make him look like he could go off at any minute. In real life, the 39-year-old is anything but volatile. A passionate photographer and avid reader, Goggins takes the works of W. Somerset Maugham along on his world travels. (He and writer-director Nadia Conners named their child Augustus Somerset—after the author.)

Since coming to town from Georgia, Goggins has landed steady work in films ranging from The Apostle to The Bourne Identity. Now the parts are getting bigger. Working around his Justified schedule, raising the new baby and remodeling his 1927 Hollywood house, Goggins shot a role in Universal’s sci-fi thriller Cowboys & Aliens, which opens July 29. He’s also in Rod Lurie’s Straw Dogs remake, coming in September, and recently filmed his part in 2012’s independent drama Officer Down.

Goggins currently sports barely visible braces to correct a long-ago Little League accident that knocked out some teeth. As might be expected from someone who makes his living being stared at, he had become a little self-conscious about his appearance. Just not enough to keep from smiling.

This is two hit FX series in a row for you now. Do you feel like more of a cable actor than a broadcast actor?
I think broadcast would probably say that. [Laughs.] You know, when I first moved out here 20 years ago, the people working in television were more often than not conventionally good-looking. They had a safety about them that I don’t have.

But there’s always a place in Hollywood for interesting-looking character actors.
Oh, absolutely. I think that’s why I was able to make a living in movies. And this kind of programming we’re doing—serialized storytelling—started with The Sopranos. It was almost as if independent film began to find an alternate home on cable. It was a prime opportunity for someone like me.

Was the Georgia you grew up in anything like Justified’s Harlan County, Kentucky?
No, but there are people I grew up with from the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains that would give any person on Justified a run for their money in the scary department. Continue Reading →