Jan 21, 2018

IGN: Walton Goggins Explains ‘Tomb Raider’ Villain’s Motives

Jan 21, 2018

IGN: Walton Goggins Explains ‘Tomb Raider’ Villain’s Motives

“I suppose his vendetta, if there is one, really comes from anger and frustration at the last seven years of his life, at the mundane kind of aspect of his life, which is looking for this tomb, you know? He’s wasted his life and has missed his family, looking for this thing that Lara Croft’s father had the coordinates for,” Goggins said of what drives Vogel in the film. “And you meet him not at the nascent stage of his journey or the apex of his journey, but literally on a Wednesday of the longest week of his life. And he’s just exhausted.”

He added, “This man is ready to get off of this island, and he will do anything to achieve that end.” As for how much of a bad guy Vogel is in the grand scheme of the story, Goggins would only describe Mathias as “a cog in the wheel, and what the audience doesn’t know is how big of a player he truly is. And I won’t ruin that for you, because I think that you need to see the movie in order to answer that question.”

Goggins, by his own admission, is not a gamer nor has he seen the original two Angelina Jolie Tomb Raider movies although he was aware of them. The actor — whose credits include Justified, The Shield, Vice Principals, and The Hateful Eight — explained why he didn’t feel the need to familiarize himself with the actual Tomb Raider games once he booked the role.

“I didn’t play this game initially, and I certainly didn’t play this game once the opportunity came to kind of go and tell this story. Because I knew that everyone else would have done that, and therefore that voice would have been served,” Goggins said. “I felt the way I could best contribute to this story is to have someone that wasn’t beholden to the mythology of Lara Croft. Someone that looks at the story based on the merits of the story. And I think you need a lot of different voices in order to try to pull something off like this.”

He continued: “And my job, the way that I saw it, to service my director, my studio, and most importantly, my fellow actor, Alicia, and the audience, was to be as authentic and three-dimensional as I could be with the parameters which I was asked to play in. And for me, that didn’t necessitate learning this game. It, for me, necessitated learning, for Mathias, what his life had been like up until that point. And I felt like we did that. You know, I think the world of Alicia and I am just blown away by her very realistic interpretation of Lara Croft. And, you know, I’m so grateful I had the chance to tell this story in this way.”

Goggins is a huge admirer of his co-star Alicia Vikander, calling her “one of the greatest actors of her generation.” He said that “she already had a fan in me, and now she has a friend for life” after making Tomb Raider together: “I genuinely believe that Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, that this new incarnation, this kind of origin story of this very, very, very powerful, powerful woman is, what you’ll see is, on screen, is a true reflection of the time that we had, man. I mean, we were in South Africa for almost four and a half months, you know? And when I wasn’t working, I mean, I traveled all over Namibia and Mozambique. And just – we worked really hard, and we played really hard, and tried to tell the best story that we could.”

Tomb Raider opens in theaters March 16th.
Source: IGN.com
Jan 20, 2018

It takes a Villiger: Actor Walton Goggins launches parenting app

Jan 20, 2018

It takes a Villiger: Actor Walton Goggins launches parenting app

Between Marvel’s upcoming “Ant-Man and the Wasp” and Warner Bros.’ “Tomb Raider” remake, actor Walton Goggins (“Vice Principals,” “Justified”) has flown more than 100,000 miles in the last year for work.

That makes it challenging for him and his wife, filmmaker Nadia Conners, to take care of their 6-year-old son and find trusted, reliable sitters, tutors and music teachers. They found themselves constantly texting and calling friends for recommendations, and then turning to the internet, which turned up unvetted strangers.

So Goggins created an app, called Villiger, that’s intended to be a platform that helps like-minded parents connect, find recommendations and book support for their kids.

“My grandmother brought me up and would always tell me it takes a village to raise a child,” Goggins said in a statement. “Now I know what she meant and I am hoping that Villiger will give every parent the village they need to make parenting easier.”

The app enables parents to share sitters, set playdates, and find baseball coaches and piano teachers through the friends and neighbors who make up their “village.” Users can also receive recommendations, advice, requests and contacts within that network, and the app provides direct booking and payment for a variety of support providers including sitters, tutors, music teachers, housekeepers and more.

“Whether I’m traveling to film scenes in different cities and need support, or if I’m at home and trying to arrange a sitter for a spontaneous date night with Nadia, I can simply launch Villiger and my extended community is there, ready to recommend and book,” Goggins said. “No more texting 50 friends during their work hour or dinner time in my frantic search for help.”

With undisclosed seed funding from Nir Zohar, president of Wix; Mark Tluszcz, founding partner of VC firm Mangrove Capital; and Stephen Stokols, co-founder and CEO of FreedomPop, Villiger launches its mobile app in public beta today on iOS and Android.

The app has been in the works for about a year and employs 11 people.

Goggins elaborated via email on what Villiger brings to the market, how beta testers have used it in unexpected ways, and how he plans to monetize it.

What apps did you try before deciding to make your own?

There are no other apps in the market that allow parents to connect and recommend/share resources with each other. That’s why we decided to build Villiger. Unlike Nextdoor, which is a mass social network, we are a focused trusted recommendation and booking platform:

  1. You can actually book and pay through Villiger, like TaskRabbit.
  2. It is not open to random neighbors, but only your village, your trusted network, so this is not a mass local social network.

There are apps for finding sitters, or there are apps for finding a random handyman, etc., but there’s no app out there to get a recommended piano teacher for my son. Or ask my parent friends if they know a math tutor for my daughter. Instead, you either Google and sort through strangers, or start texting and calling people to get recommendations.

How has the app worked so far?

So far we have select beta testers on [it]. What has been interesting is that we happened to open the beta at the same time [Independent School Entrance Exam] testing for kids entering middle schools was coming up. We saw a huge surge in people looking for and recommending and booking ISEE tutors, which was an unexpected benefit. We learned that niche support like tutors and coaches is a great use case for our app, especially in L.A.

How do you plan on attracting users to Villiger?

Though marketing, viral inviting and word of mouth. The app works best when you have friends in your village, and we are seeing that the average users invites eight-plus people into his village. We are also partnering with parent groups and bloggers to promote our tool, initially focused on those in L.A.

Source: bizjournals.com

Nov 23, 2017

Video: Walton Goggins’ Mulholland Distilling Aims to Capture the Spirit of Los Angeles

Nov 23, 2017

Video: Walton Goggins’ Mulholland Distilling Aims to Capture the Spirit of Los Angeles

Nov 9, 2017

Walton Goggins Doesn’t Care Whether You Liked His Character on Vice Principals

Nov 9, 2017

Walton Goggins Doesn’t Care Whether You Liked His Character on Vice Principals

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hard to those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

In his exit interview with GQ, Goggins talks about committing hardto those frosted tips and why the race controversy over Season One was “pandering.”

Walton Goggins has long had one of the most recognizable faces in entertainment, but now he’s finally building a name for himself to match. The character actor had back-to-back standout turns in beloved dramas The Shield and Justified, and more recently joined a very exclusive club of people who have survived a Quentin Tarantino movie.

He’s also one half of the crass, awful pair of vice principals in HBO’s Vice Principals, in which Lee Russell (Goggins) and Neal Gamby (Danny McBride), are enemies-turned-friends with the sole goal of becoming the principal at a small South Carolina high school. Created by Jody Hill and McBride, who also conceived Eastbound and DownVice Principals is an often hilarious, often sad character study of two men locked in a ceaseless battle not so much with each other, but with themselves.

The show comes to an end this Sunday after two seasons, which was the plan from the beginning. For fans, and for Goggins, it’s a bittersweet ending to a show—and character—that were often deeper and more profound than their reputation would suggest. Goggins took some time out of his schedule (he’s currently filming villainous turns in two highly-anticipated blockbusters, Ant-Man and the Wasp and Tomb Raider) to talk about how the loud, fey villain Lee Russell came to be, and how the hell to relate to a character who burns down houses and compulsively lies to his wife.

The show is very funny, I swear.

Let’s start at the beginning. How did you get this role, Lee Russell?
I knew David [Gordon Green] from the independent world; I’ve known him for the better part of 13 years, 14 years. I actually read for Season Four of Eastbound and Down. I walked into this audition and there were literally five comedians from Saturday Night Live and me! I thought, “Well, this is never going to fucking happen.” But I was like, “Ah, fuck it. I don’t care. Let’s go in and let’s play.” I ultimately did not get the role. It went to [Jason] Sudeikis. And they were wise to do that.

But! Vice Principals came along and they were going back and forth about how they wanted to approach it. They thought about a traditional comedian for Lee, and then David, I think, threw out “Goggins” in the room and they all went, “He’s the fucking guy! That’s it. It’s gotta be Goggins.” So Danny reached out while I was doing The Hateful Eight and sent me the script, and I just got it.

How much of Lee Russell was written or conceived before you came into it? The weird shirts and the accent itself, and the frosted tips?
The frosted tips were there, and the first thing Danny said to me was, “Listen, you don’t have to frost your tips.” I said, “Oh yeah. Oh, I’m frosting the fucking tips.” The tips will be frosted! Hair that you see and hair that you don’t see will have tips frosted. [laughs]

I don’t know I really knew Russell until we got on the set the first day. I was full of fear. I just literally wrapped Hateful Eight at 9:30 in the morning and went straight to the airport, got on a plane, landed, got to the house and 11:30 at night. Frosted my tips and woke up at 6:00 the next morning just to become Lee Russell.

How did you approach them as lead characters, Russell and Gamby? Protagonists? They’re tonally not heroes, or even antiheroes, for that matter.
I don’t think they are. I don’t think they are protagonists. We’re exploring a side of ourselves or our society that we all know exists without giving the audience many things to cheer about. Unless you can cheer at the truths of how deeply insecure they are, and you can cheer or root for a person once you understand why they are who they are.

When I came into this, I said, “Buddy, there are things here about this guy, once you really kind of get in to him, that are very painful.” I don’t know that they anticipated it resonating or vibrating on that deeper level with me. I don’t know that they fully understood my interpretation of the depth of Lee Russell’s pain. Continue Reading →

Sep 20, 2017

Video: Walton Drops by The Rachael Ray Show

Sep 20, 2017

Video: Walton Drops by The Rachael Ray Show

Sep 18, 2017

Walton Goggins Pushes Back At Critics & Talks Season 2 Of ‘Vice Principals’

Sep 18, 2017

Walton Goggins Pushes Back At Critics & Talks Season 2 Of ‘Vice Principals’

Is there any chance of a Justified reboot or return? I don’t know if there are any reboots in production, but…we’ve talked about [continuing], and what that would be like. We’ve had conversations. But, it was such a fulfilling end to that journey, I think it would have to be real special for our showrunner, Graham Yost, to want to do that.

But with him or with Tim [Olyphant], I would be there, in a moment’s notice. It’s really hard to lay Boyd Crowder down and it’s hard to lay down the relationship that I had with Tim’s character, Raylan Givens. You know, I even miss saying the name…”Hello, Raylan.”

The way you just rolled it off your tongue… such relish, such fire. It meant a lot of different things at different times. It’s like, how many meanings does Sam Jackson have for “motherfucker?” It’s the same thing for “Raylan Givens.”

It would be really hard to improve on the final line, “we dug coal together.” Which was such a perfect, poetic end for a show that never tried to be fancy with its storytelling, but got to the heart of this very unique relationship. Absolutely. It wasn’t a world that was supposed to be fancy. Raylan doesn’t talk very much. He’s taciturn by nature, whereas Boyd Crowder is an eloquent, poetic killer. And a charmer.

Speaking of men who aren’t that fancy, we start the second and final season of Vice Principals with Lee having finally ascended to the throne at the school. The king! The king of all kings! [laughs] The biggest office in the building.

And he’s also remade the school in his image, which is really something. Yes, like America, know what I’m saying? [laughs] I’m joking. Yes, he has remade the school in his image, because you know, he’s a narcissist. I’m surprised he didn’t put up more mirrors.

I really like the painting [an over-the-top one of Lee that I won’t spoil here] that he has in the office. That’s one of my favorite production touches. [laughs] Me too man! When they wrote that, I just had no idea what they would really look like, and then they showed them to me for the first time, and I just could not stop laughing. But they only showed me one at a time, because in the story something happens, and there’s a new painting installed in the principal’s office. And it’s even funnier and more perfect than the first one.

How would you describe Lee’s sense of style in general? Whimsical. One of a celebration, just a rainbow of joy and happiness. Sarah Trost was our wardrobe designer, and I think it’s the first time she ever worked with Danny. And I’ll never forget the first day that I met her, and the conversation that ensued, and what she pulled out of her case. As wardrobe designers do, she fundamentally dialed into what Lee was going to be for me. I think Danny would say the same thing about her.

You know, we know a lot of people in the South—both Danny and I, and Jody and David for that matter [Editor’s Note: Jody Hill is co-creator, director and executive producer of the show, and David Gordon Green is a director and executive producer on the show; both are frequent collaborators with McBride]—that you don’t know whether they’re gay or they’re straight. You know, they’re these effeminate kind of guys in the South that are so lovely, they’re so wonderful, and this was kind of an amalgamation of a few of those people that I knew. Continue Reading →

Sep 16, 2017

Video: Walton Goggins & Danny McBride Talk ‘Vice Principals’ Season 2 with TV Guide Magazine

Sep 16, 2017

Video: Walton Goggins & Danny McBride Talk ‘Vice Principals’ Season 2 with TV Guide Magazine

Sep 16, 2017

Video: Richard Gere And Walton Goggins Talk ‘Three Christs’ At TIFF

Sep 16, 2017

Video: Richard Gere And Walton Goggins Talk ‘Three Christs’ At TIFF

Sep 15, 2017

Danny McBride and Walton Goggins on Vice Principals Season Two, Edgy Comedy, and Why the Show Is a ‘Cautionary Tale’

Sep 15, 2017

Danny McBride and Walton Goggins on Vice Principals Season Two, Edgy Comedy, and Why the Show Is a ‘Cautionary Tale’

“At this very specific moment in America, do we really need to be laughing at two white dudes having so much fun trying to destroy a black woman?,” my colleague Jen Chaney wrote in her review of Vice Principals last year. I get it. I almost quit too. During its first season, the HBO comedy’s embodiments of toxic masculinity, Neal Gamby (Danny McBride, who co-created the show with frequent collaborator Jody Hill) and Lee Russell (Walton Goggins), did everything they could to undermine and terrorize Dr. Belinda Brown (Kimberly Hebert Gregory), all because they felt entitled to the principal job that she earned. In an early episode, they even burn down her house, but I actually found certain actions later in the season harder to stomach. I won’t spoil them just in case you want to catch up. Because I think you should. If you can.

After seeing much of Vice Principals season two, which was entirely directed by David Gordon Green instead of Hill, who directed season one, I can say it’s definitely worth it. As McBride explained to me, season one was about building a certain tension, about delaying judgment, and season two is the release. It’s Judgment Day. Even the people who like the first season said it was fascinating but laughless; that isn’t the case anymore. Vice Principals definitely feels like a comedy this time around and a special one at that. After watching an episode where Gamby, forced to substitute teach A.P. History, flails while trying to explain the Reconstruction period, I remembered feeling lucky that I stuck with it. In era of binge-watching, it is a rare experience, but by forcing the audience to sit in its discomfort, the payoff on the other end is magnified.

McBride still isn’t sure how he feels about it, though. He wanted to tell a different kind of comedic story, but he’s aware that doing so means that people who might have appreciated Vice Principals will never finish it. Ahead of Sunday’s season-two premiere, McBride and Goggins discuss the show’s unique structure, why they don’t want you to feel sympathetic for Gamby and Russell, and what a story conceived of a decade ago means under a Trump presidency.

There was a certain criticism in early reviews that it was unclear if the show was indicting the actions of these characters. And I felt that as I watched the show in real time, but then it all clicked with that final shot of season one, pun intended, with Gamby bleeding out on the pavement. The indictment came, but you wanted to give the audience the experience of sitting in that feeling as long as possible.

Walton Goggins: [Clapping] Well done, you.

DM: Our hope was to use people’s knowledge of what they’ve seen in other movies and shows against them, presenting these guys like they’re the heroes, and instantly, in the second episode, having them burn down their boss’s house. It keeps you, as an audience member, not sure of what you’re rooting for or what you want to have happen. It’s why we didn’t make it as a feature: In an hour and a half, we felt like you could see the writing on the wall, but spreading it out over 18 episodes, you’re allowed to take these detours and explore other characters and it suddenly makes you feel conflicted about where it’s heading. The type of comedy Jody and I have created before is not stuff you can give to a test audience. The average person isn’t necessarily going to gravitate towards it, and I think that’s because there’s a lot more going on than would appear.

It’s a give-and-take. Forcing people to watch it week over week and building that tension about the end goal is a more satisfying experience, but it means some people will lose out. A lot of both seasons is showing how bad these characters’ home lives are. How do you walk a line of explaining their behavior, but not necessarily justifying it?
DM: Ultimately, we’re not asking the audience to show sympathy for these guys. We’re just presenting what their story is. That’s the thing that’s most frustrating about these characters: You will see something in them that you might identify with, and then they still do shit you don’t want them to do. It’s not justifying behavior. It’s just making you frustrated at the way people are. It’s a character study, as much as Taxi Driver is on Travis Bickle. At the end of that movie you’re not like, “Man, isn’t he so sympathetic, these things he did?” It’s a fucked-up journey!

WG: I don’t wake up in the morning, judging this person. That’s not my job. I don’t have to fall in love with him or condone his behavior. My job has been around for thousands of years, man. I’m a storyteller and I try to look for stories that challenge me. For me, Lee Russell and Neal Gamby start off in such an emotional hole. They’re six feet under before they even step out of bed in the morning. I was just really, really curious about the source of this pain and their desire to share it with someone.

I was rewatching some press thing you guys did for the first episode, and it had a quote I hadn’t seen anywhere: “Vice Principals is a dark, strange, twisted tale about leadership, friendship, loyalty, and the fall of Western civilization.” 
DM: [Laughs.]

I was like, “He knew!” The show taps into a thing, coincidentally, that some might fear will lead to the collapse of Western civilization. Do you think as Southerners who’ve grown up more around certain people, you understand something that those in the Hollywood “bubble” might not?
DM: I don’t even think it has to be the South. It’s human nature. There can be a guy in the hills of L.A. or a guy in the hills of the Appalachian Mountains who act this way when they’re hurt, or don’t have what they need in life. I don’t know why, but we have been obsessed with the angry Southern man! Jody Hill and myself grew up in the South, and we’re proud of that, but we would’ve been considered the most liberal guys in the South. When you come to Hollywood, you’re considered conservative just because you’re from the South! And yet we went to art school! I didn’t hunt. I wasn’t into NASCAR.

WG: For example, I really don’t believe that the racial element was injected into the first season. I think that was an interpretation. It’s really more of a study of greed! Outside of this pain that these two guys obviously have from things that have happened in their life, it’s a narcissistic, unempathetic fucking nature that really can reflect our culture at times. Hopefully at the end of this, they’re going to be able to step outside of that and see what they truly can be and what they do need from other people.

Continue reading at Vulture.com

Sep 15, 2017

Walton Visits Late Night with Seth Meyers (Captures, Stills + Video)

Sep 15, 2017

Walton Visits Late Night with Seth Meyers (Captures, Stills + Video)

Walton stopped by Late Night with Seth Meyers on September 13th to promote Vice Principals which premieres its second and final season this Sunday on HBO. During the interview, Walton talked about visiting New York with his son Augustus and a hilarious story from a telemarketer who happened to be a big fan of his. It was a great interview and worth a watch in case you missed it.

You can view high quality stills and HD captures from his appearance in the gallery now.