Apr 3, 2013

Justified Season 4 Finale Post Mortem – Index Post

Apr 3, 2013

Justified Season 4 Finale Post Mortem – Index Post

Check out snippets of what Justified show-runner Graham Yost had to say about the season four finale and what’s to come in season 5! Plenty more under the cut!

They show up to the spot and find police have already found the body. Instead of leaving, Boyd goes up to talk to Officer Mooney (William Gregory Lee), which I thought was a surprising choice.
He’s Boyd. They can’t arrest him for just driving. So he’ll just go up. His relationship with Mooney has been on and off. It seemed like a smart way for him to find out more.

Boyd then decides to use Mooney and Lee Paxton (Sam Anderson), whose funeral home serves as storage for law enforcement, to help him switch bodies so it’s not Delroy’s body that was found.
That came out of the room. What would Boyd try to do? Okay, so, they’ve got Ellen May, she could testify, but if they don’t have a body, then the case might fall apart. So let’s take care of the body and get it out of there. We can’t? Okay, where is it? We’re still not done yet. It’s just that Boyd sense of he’ll always keep working a problem until it’s absolutely impossible to do so. And believe you me, at the beginning of next season, we’re gonna see him continue to work the problem. How can he get Ava out of jail? And what will he do in order to accomplish that?

Boyd and Jimmy digging up the grave for a replacement body was a surprisingly fun scene with Jimmy falling through the coffin.
Those guys in a graveyard at night, in a potter’s field, digging up a corpse, stuff comes up. I don’t know exactly the origin of Boyd’s run about who that is in the ground. The little behind the scenes thing is Jesse Lukens, on one take, when his foot went through, he actually damaged his foot quite badly. At the cast party, he was on crutches. He was in real pain. But we use that on Justified — if a character’s in real pain, we use it.

While that’s happening, Boyd is driving Raylan to the airport for the meeting. That’s another crucial scene that’s all dialogue.
That scene had a lot of talk between the writers, and Tim, and Walton. What can we get out of here? Tim is always interested in being clear that Boyd is a bad guy, but as he basically says, “You’re a white supremacist, you’re leading a church out in the woods. Who are you, and what do you really believe in? So if you say you love this woman [Ava], how is that different from all the other stuff that you’ve said?” Of course, Boyd maintains that it is different. We wanted to play up that dynamic, and then the whole notion of Boyd going at Raylan is something that we’d established pretty nicely in the opening of episode 10 when he says, “Raylan, you are an asshole, you should have been an outlaw.” And that just goes back thematically to Raylan and Arlo: Who is Raylan? How much is he like Arlo? Is he really just Arlo with a badge?

Continue reading over at EW.COM

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Feb 23, 2013

Walton Tells The Jeff Probst Show a Scuba Story

Feb 23, 2013

Walton Tells The Jeff Probst Show a Scuba Story

Jan 17, 2013

Walton Talks ‘Justified’ Season 4 with Crave Online!

Jan 17, 2013

Walton Talks ‘Justified’ Season 4 with Crave Online!

Head on over to CRAVEONLINE.COM to check out Walton’s full interview where he discusses Justified, Django Unchained and his Sons of Anarchy guest appearance.

CraveOnline: On the panel, Joelle Carter talked about Ava’s relationship with Boyd. Do you and she come from a similar perspective on the relationship?

Walton Goggins: Yeah, well, Joelle’s a very smart woman, a very smart person so it’s always kind of enlightening to hear things from her point of view. We actually did a scene yesterday, two days ago and I saw it a completely different way. I had no idea really what it was going to be about but I thought well, it’s probably going to be about this and Joelle said, “You know what? No, I think it’s this. I think this is really where they are.” And I looked at her and I said, “Really? This is a bold move.” And she said, “No, this is where it is” and we went there. It was so gratifying and so surprising, so she knows Ava as well as I know Boyd.

CraveOnline: Which episode is that going to be in?

Walton Goggins: That’s going to be in episode eight, I think the last scene for Boyd and Ava in episode eight.

CraveOnline: How would you describe Boyd’s relationship with Raylan this season?

Walton Goggins: There’s one line that Boyd’s never said in the previous three seasons that he says this season. It’s really interesting to me and an indication as to where they’ve kind of come in this relationship, and Boyd looks at Raylan at one point, and he says, “Raylan, I don’t like you.” And it’s the first time he’s ever really kind of said it that way, so I don’t know.

And over the course of their relationship, Boyd has seen their friendship as one thing and Raylan has seen it as something else. But at the end of this season, they may see it the same way, and that is that they don’t like each other. We’ll see where it goes from there.

Jan 16, 2013

Walton Talks JUSTIFIED Season 4, His Guest Spot as Venus Van Dam on SONS OF ANARCHY, and More with Collider!

Jan 16, 2013

Walton Talks JUSTIFIED Season 4, His Guest Spot as Venus Van Dam on SONS OF ANARCHY, and More with Collider!

Check out Walton’s entire interview over at COLLIDER.COM

Collider: Boyd Crowder got lucky, not having to go to prison at the end of last season. Where is his head at, this season?

WALTON GOGGINS: For a fellow like Boyd, he understands that there’s going to be a price to be paid for eating this dinner, and for living this life. At the end of last season, he thought that his time had come. For him, it had just come a little too early because he wasn’t ready to say goodbye to the love of his life (Ava Crowder). And as fate would have it, gratefully for this couple, he was spared at the last minute and someone else took the blame for it. So this season, I think he’s working very, very hard to get his ducks in a row, for a very specific reason. I won’t tell you what that reason is, but it will be revealed, over the course of the show. Boyd has an endgame, and I think it’s worthy of working as hard as he’s working.

Last season, Boyd was a bit more serious because he had to spend a lot of time trying to get his crew together and figuring out what he wanted to do. Is it refreshing to have more of his sense of humor back, this season?

GOGGINS: Yeah, and now is the season for that to happen. We really wanted to get back to his ironic, pessimistic sense of humor. It’s really Elmore Leonard’s sense of humor. It’s the way that he constructs humor and infuses his narratives with humor. Hopefully, it’s delivered in a way where you’re not sure if you’re supposed to laugh, but you laugh because you are supposed to laugh. We’ve had a really good time with that, so far this season. Boyd is having a good time. Some of it is a little hard, but for the most part, he’s having a really good time.

Would you say that, at this point, he’s enjoying being a crime boss, or has it become more of a hassle than he ever really bargained for?

GOGGINS: Well, I think that it’s both. There’s a dual response to that question. One of my favorites lines that Boyd had, in the first episode of the season, and it’s one of my favorite lines that he’s uttered in his fourth-year incarnation, was, “I’m a criminal.” He just says it. It’s three words. If somebody has that clarity about who they are, as a person, there’s only really one way to go. Well, maybe there’s two ways to go. Either you continue to be a criminal, or you try to segueway out of being a criminal. But for right now, I think Boyd is grateful and has worked very hard to finally rise to the top of the heap in Harlan County. Unfortunately, when you’re the king of the hill, there’s really only one way to go, and that’s down. We’ll see how that plays out, over the course of the season. But, I think it’s a little more responsibility and fiduciary responsibility than he anticipated. Nonetheless, he’s a wiley guy. He has an endgame in mind and he’s working very hard, this season, to achieve that.

With everyone seemingly hooked on Jesus this season, will that continue to be a thorn in Boyd’s side, or will he be able to use that to his advantage, in some way?

GOGGINS: When they first pitched this idea and Graham [Yost] wrote that first episode, what intrigued me about it, more than anything, was Boyd’s fear of going into church. There’s one scene in the second episode where he’s snappy with everyone, including Ava, and he says, “I don’t like churches.” He has a reason for that. He feels, on one level, like he was misled or misguided, or that God turned his back on him. He feels like a hypocrite. He feels a lot of different things. So, the religious aspect of the show will really make Boyd question where he’s come from and how he views the institution. It will hopefully solidify his idea, one way or the other, about which direction he’s going to go. I think those are larger themes that play into where we would like to take the show, ultimately, and what Boyd has to say about life, through the culmination of all his experiences. That’s a very good question.

Jan 15, 2013

Walton Talks Justified Season 4, Boyd’s “Spiritual Crisis”

Jan 15, 2013

Walton Talks Justified Season 4, Boyd’s “Spiritual Crisis”

Check out Walton’s entire interview over at TVFANATIC.COM

TVF: Talk to us about religion because it’s something that has popped up for Boyd throughout the series, including this year with Joe Mazzello’s preacher character.
WG:
Well, I think what the writers really wanted to do in talking about Boyd and where is Boyd in how he feels about that institution, where is he in his life, and the thing about having Joe Mazzello, he’s an unbelievable actor. He plays this preacher that comes back in Boyd’s world.

Boyd is so reticent about stepping into that tent. It’s not a place that he’s comfortable with anymore and in some ways it allows Boyd to go into a spiritual crisis and to look at a man who is extensively himself and hopefully learn something from this interaction, as violent as it may get. That there’s a lesson there that there may be something wrong with the messenger, but there’s not something wrong with the message.

TVF: Does that make Boyd relook at where he is with his faith? Is that what that story becomes about?
WG:
I think it’s part of it or coming to terms with how he really feels about it.

TVF: When Boyd and Raylan’s paths cross again is their relationship the same as it’s been or is it different?
WG:
It’s different. It’s different. It’s familiar but to me it’s different and where they’re headed to this season…this level of acrimony will not be something that we’ve done before in the show. I think at one point civility is going to go out the door, yet it may be more civil than it’s ever been when we first meet. But it’s funny where it needs to be and it’s dramatic where it needs to be.

TVF: What would you say is Boyd’s endgame? Does he want power? Does he want money? Does he want love?
WG:
[Grins] I know what Boyd’s endgame is. But I can’t tell you and hopefully we get an opportunity to tell it but I have a real deep understanding of what Boyd’s endgame is. What’s interesting is this season you will clearly understand what Boyd’s endgame is now and based on that going forward the repercussions of going after this dream will significantly change, but set him on a path to his real endgame. It’s deep.

Jan 7, 2013

Walton Defends the South’s Good Name, In Bad-Guy Roles

Jan 7, 2013

Walton Defends the South’s Good Name, In Bad-Guy Roles

Do not miss Walton’s entire interview with New York Magazine over at VULTURE.COM

002 Galerie St. Etienne, hidden in the back of a 57th Street office building, is full of elderly women whispering reverently before drawings by Expressionist painter Egon Schiele, many of them sexually explicit. It’s a bit incongruous, and then Walton Goggins bursts through the door, his slightly sunburned face the only break in head-to-toe black. Immediately there is that smile, those large and blinding white teeth, promising both seduction and menace. And then the luscious drawl: “Hello, darlin’!” I’d wondered why the actor—who stars as charming criminal Boyd Crowder on the FX drama Justified—had chosen to meet here, but all is quickly revealed. “I played Schiele when I was 24, in a theater piece in Los Angeles,” he says. “It was about his incarceration in 1912 for pornography and the seduction of a minor. Wow!” Goggins walks toward a drawing. “That’s Wally, his mistress. She was the love of his life.” He leans in, his nose nearly touching the glass. “We had a copy of it pinned up [at the theater], but I’ve never seen it in person. What’s crazy to me is that Schiele accomplished this astonishing body of work in just 28 years, which is when he died, and I only feel like I can really understand how to play him now, at 41.”

Goggins had been knocking around Hollywood, on TV and in movies, for twelve years before he landed his breakout part as Shane Vendrell on the canonical cop drama The Shield in 2002. The character, meant to die in an early episode, was saved by Goggins’s appeal. Boyd Crowder nearly met the same fate, but again, the actor proved irresistible, and three seasons into Justified (the fourth begins this week), the show is arguably as much about Crowder as about its central character, Deputy Marshal Raylan Givens, played by Timothy Olyphant. “I’ve always been invited through the back door. It hasn’t been easy for me,” says Goggins, whose weathered near prettiness has generally attracted roles as miscreants and, in one spectacularly convincing cameo on this season’s Sons of Anarchy, a transgender prostitute named Venus Van Dam. “I would never have gotten the jobs I did without the advent of cable television,” he adds, “which brought back the kinds of raw, authentic leading actors you had in the seventies: Duvall, Ed Harris, Tommy Lee Jones.”

It’s true that one of Justified’s many gifts is in reviving the allure of men who are, well, men. The show is based on a short story by Elmore Leonard, which provides the rugged, silver-tongued DNA of Raylan and Boyd. But Olyphant and Goggins have a lot of say in the shaping of their characters. “Tim and I butt heads,” says Goggins. “He keeps his compass on the Elmore Leonard of it all. He understands the balance between the absurd and the violent. But I am constantly battling for the heart, the raw feeling behind what Elmore is saying. I want to know what’s going on ten feet down.”

Jan 4, 2013

Yahoo TV on DVD: ‘Justified’ star Walton Goggins talks new season, ‘Lincoln,’ ‘Django Unchained,’ and ‘Sons of Anarchy’

Jan 4, 2013

Yahoo TV on DVD: ‘Justified’ star Walton Goggins talks new season, ‘Lincoln,’ ‘Django Unchained,’ and ‘Sons of Anarchy’

Don’t miss Walton’s entire interview with YAHOO.COM

Our boy Boyd Crowder is in a very different place when the new season opens. How thrown is he by the appearance of this new preacher?
I think Boyd is, for the first time, in charge, really in charge of something — of an enterprise, so to speak, a criminal kind of entity. That is, the criminal empire that he runs in Harlan County. There’s no one else really challenging him there. With that comes a lot of fiduciary responsibilities. Once you’ve made it, once you have something to lose, then you need to defend your territory. That’s all new to Boyd. Between that, between his relationship with Ava, between the opportunities that are going to present themselves by working with the people up in Lexington and in Detroit, he is, in some ways, stepping way out of his league. That will continue as the season continues.
One part of that is greed. But what (showrunner) Graham (Yost) does and what Elmore Leonard does and what our writers try to do, when they are emulating Elmore, is give (Boyd) a reason for doing the things that he’s doing. That’s something that is the most important thing to me. Hopefully, what you’ll see is that these steps, stepping out of one’s comfort zone, are in the service of something greater. Boyd really has an endgame. He’s working hard to that end. You won’t really know what that endgame is until the season progresses. He sees this as a real opportunity to make some changes in his life that will affect him for the rest of his life and the people around him. We’ll see whether or not he makes it. (Laughing)

Some people describe Boyd as a villain, but we never think of him that way. He’s a complicated guy for sure, but not really a villain. Do you agree?
I would never use that word to describe him. What we like to do — and what, again, is servicing the story, coming at it from that angle — is to always try to find balance.

How big of a role does Ava play in who Boyd becomes?
I think Ava plays the biggest role. Second to Ava is his relationship with Raylan. Maybe before those two, Boyd is Boyd’s biggest ally in the sense that Boyd demands of himself a certain amount of self reflection and growth. I think that’s really the only way he survives. For him, being stagnant is death. So, between those three entities, he will ultimately get to wherever it is he’s going.

Dec 30, 2012

Walton talks ‘Django Unchained,’ ‘Justified’ with LA TIMES

Dec 30, 2012

Walton talks ‘Django Unchained,’ ‘Justified’ with LA TIMES

Don’t miss his entire interview over at LATIMES.COM

Did you get acting whiplash playing these wildly different roles, from crazed killer to transgender hooker?

I’ve been around for so long, and this opportunity came up and then this opportunity came up and then Venus came up. I feel like I’m in the place that I always wanted to be. I have ideas about the career that I would like to have, but when I say that, in some ways, I’m already having it.

Which is eclectic?

Yeah. Some of the people with careers that I would like to have are Sam Rockwell and Chris Cooper and Ed Harris and Tommy Lee [Jones] and Bob Duvall. You look at what these people have contributed to this art form, and they’ve done it in a way that’s iconic.

In “Django Unchained” that torture scene with Jamie Foxx, where he’s hanging upside down, looked tricky to film. Was it?

Emotionally it was very tricky to film, but just in the physical requirements, having to hang upside down for any period of time. And it’s tough to photograph that. And [writer-director] Quentin [Tarantino] was our leader. Because he was so supportive and all the actors were so supportive of each other, it really allowed each of us to go way out on a limb and if it broke, know that one of the other people were going to catch us.

Gallery Link:
Photo Sessions > Session #014

Dec 30, 2012

Walton explains how his role kept growing in ‘Django Unchained’ to HITFIX

Dec 30, 2012

Walton explains how his role kept growing in ‘Django Unchained’ to HITFIX

Dec 26, 2012

Interview Magazine: Walton Goggins’ Unchained Melody

Dec 26, 2012

Interview Magazine: Walton Goggins’ Unchained Melody

You can read Walton’s entire interview over at INTERVIEWMAGAZINE.COM and don’t miss the new shoot added to the gallery as well, you can find the link below.

EMMA BROWN: Quentin Tarantino seems so energetic. I can’t even imagine being around him every day.

WALTON GOGGINS: I hate to use this as a metaphor, but making movies is kind of like going to war. It’s not—but the stamina required and what it takes to tell a story that is this big in scope, you need a general that will bring out the best in you. And that’s what Quentin did for us, and has done for so many other actors.

BROWN: Does he ever have an off day—where he’s kind of quiet?

GOGGINS: Never. No. There are days where he’s more vocal than others. But the days where he’s not as vocal, I think he’s just taking the time to figure out what he needs from this particular scene. There were days where it was really difficult for all the actors. One day in particular for me was this kind of torture scene with Jamie [Foxx], which was much longer than how it is in the film. It took us five days to do it, between Sam [Samuel L. Jackson], and myself, and Jamie. It was emotionally very tough to deal with, looking at a man [Jamie Foxx’s character, Django] strung upside down, and taking his manhood, his ability to spread his seed, in my hand and literally terminating him—his lineage—which is what slavery did to so many people. It was really, really difficult, and Quentin was very, very respectful, and it was as hard for Jamie there, being hung up, as it was for me. I’m a liberal guy that lives on the West Coast—I hardly eat meat, much less castrate people. And there was one particular moment where it was just like, “Let’s do it. Let’s do this. Let’s do it right. Let’s do it for all the people this fucking happened to.” Afterwards, we were at a dinner and just kind of talking about it, kind of letting that experience wash all over us, and I just remember being so grateful for having had that experience. And participating in the retelling of that experience.

BROWN: Was the prospect of that scene hanging over your head when you first met Jamie?

GOGGINS: Yeah, there were a couple of scenes that wound up not making it into the movie that were hanging over my head—it was actually something that I was looking forward to. As an actor, it’s like having a scene where you make love to a woman, a leading lady, and for me, I’m pretty shy when it comes to that. In some ways I try to overcompensate by being friendly, and then my other modus operandi is to go the other way and not say anything—say nothing. With Jamie, he was gracious enough, and very, very supportive, to really reach out; and we became friends, which, contrary to what I normally think, made that scene better. Because I knew that we were in a realm of Quentin Tarantino pretend and this was out of the imagination of Q.T., it wasn’t something that personally Walton Goggins and Jamie Foxx were participating in. So, yeah it was good. He’s a really good man.

Gallery Link:
Photo Sessions > Session #015